patriliny


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patriliny

(ˈpætrɪˌlɪnɪ)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) the tracing of family descent through males

patriliny

relationship or descent by the male line, as in ancestry, inheritance, etc. — patrilineal, patrilinear, adj.
See also: Ancestors
relationship or descent through the male line, as in ancestry, inheritance, etc. — patrilineal, patrilinear, adj.
See also: Relationship
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References in periodicals archive ?
As Clara Tuite observes, "the adoption of the poor niece is a function of the master's charity which throughout the eighteenth century changed from being a patriarchal duty to an individual action, as the aristocratic familial structure changed from patriarchy, which retained ties of kindred, to patriliny, a structure that reduces kin to the line of descent.
He argued against Lewis Henry Morgan's evolutionary ideas about group marriage, Howitt's views on exogamy between Aboriginal groups, and Spencer and Gillen's (and Carl Strehlow's) accounts of patriliny among the Arrernte of central Australia.
Aeschylus has taken care to show the suffering of Cassandra as bound up with her new lord and master, Agamemnon, whose painful fates she articulates, thus providing for us a vision of male suffering which serves to re-affirm the bonds of patriliny rendered so fragile by the wicked wife.
viii) Patriliny, a short hand word for the rule of a patrilineal sense of connection between generations, may have shaped inheritance rules, residence patterns and other rules so that they favor men.
Patriliny and patrilocality are the key features of such a system.
Pious bequests plummeted, giving way to the earthly concerns of patriliny throughout the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries.
Jay explores the threefold relationship of patriliny, sacrifice, and male dominance in ancient Israel, particularly the Priestly and Yahwist accounts in Genesis, and in the Church after Vatican II.
The majority of the fifteen or so ethno-linguistic groups on the island permutate matriliny, patriliny, patrilocality, and uxorilocality in so various a manner that Timor offers what one might call 'an ethnographic laboratory' for the study of any number of comparative sociological problems, including those of social classification and gender.
Inheritance of land has shifted further towards patriliny, in particular with regard to coconut plantations.