patrimony


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pat·ri·mo·ny

 (păt′rə-mō′nē)
n. pl. pat·ri·mo·nies
1.
a. An inheritance from a father or paternal ancestor.
b. An inheritance or legacy; heritage.
2. An endowment or estate belonging to an institution, especially a church.

[Middle English, from Old French patrimoine, from Latin patrimōnium, from pater, patr-, father; see pəter- in Indo-European roots.]

pat′ri·mo′ni·al adj.
pat′ri·mo′ni·al·ly adv.

patrimony

(ˈpætrɪmənɪ)
n, pl -nies
1. an inheritance from one's father or other ancestor
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the endowment of a church
[C14 patrimoyne, from Old French, from Latin patrimonium paternal inheritance]
patrimonial adj
ˌpatriˈmonially adv

pat•ri•mo•ny

(ˈpæ trəˌmoʊ ni)

n., pl. -nies.
1. an estate inherited from one's father or ancestors.
2. any quality, characteristic, etc., that is inherited; heritage.
3. the estate or endowment of a religious institution.
[1300–50; Middle English < Middle French < Latin patrimōnium. See patri-, -mony]
pat`ri•mo′ni•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.patrimony - a church endowment
endowment fund, endowment - the capital that provides income for an institution
2.patrimony - an inheritance coming by right of birth (especially by primogeniture)patrimony - an inheritance coming by right of birth (especially by primogeniture)
inheritance, heritage - that which is inherited; a title or property or estate that passes by law to the heir on the death of the owner

patrimony

noun inheritance, share, heritage, portion, legacy, bequest, birthright I relinquished my estate and my patrimony. Britain's patrimony of country houses

patrimony

noun
Any special privilege accorded a firstborn:
Translations
إِرْث، ميراث
dědičný majetek
fædrenearv
isänperintöperintö
očevina
apai örökség
föîurleifî
tėvonija
dzimtīpašums
dedičný majetok
babadan kalma miras

patrimony

[ˈpætrɪmənɪ] Npatrimonio m

patrimony

nPatrimonium nt

patrimony

(ˈpӕtriməni) noun
property passed on to a person by his or her father or ancestors. This farm is part of my patrimony.
References in classic literature ?
A YOUNG MAN, a great spendthrift, had run through all his patrimony and had but one good cloak left.
They were also to preserve their ancient patrimony, which custom being broken through by the Leucadians, made their government too democratic; for by that means it was no longer necessary to be possessed of a certain fortune to be qualified to be a magistrate.
In the art of making money I have been midway between my father and grandfather: for my grandfather, whose name I bear, doubled and trebled the value of his patrimony, that which he inherited being much what I possess now; but my father Lysanias reduced the property below what it is at present: and I shall be satisfied if I leave to these my sons not less but a little more than I received.
This accident, depending primarily on the skill and virtue of the parties, of which there is every degree, and secondarily on patrimony, falls unequally, and its rights of course are unequal.
My sons, to assure you that I love you, no more need be known or said than that you are my sons; and to encourage a suspicion that I do not love you, no more is needed than the knowledge that I have no self-control as far as preservation of your patrimony is concerned; therefore, that you may for the future feel sure that I love you like a father, and have no wish to ruin you like a stepfather, I propose to do with you what I have for some time back meditated, and after mature deliberation decided upon.
In these circumstances there is a total dissimilitude between him and a king of Great Britain, who is an hereditary monarch, possessing the crown as a patrimony descendible to his heirs forever; but there is a close analogy between him and a governor of New York, who is elected for three years, and is re-eligible without limitation or intermission.
It was so beautiful a day that he was loth to forecast evil, yet something must perforce have happened at the cottage, and that of a decisive nature; for here was Miss M'Glashan on her travels, with a small patrimony in brown paper parcels, and the old lady's bearing implied hot battle and unqualified defeat.
I am poor; for I find that, when I have paid my father's debts, all the patrimony remaining to me will be this crumbling grange, the row of scathed firs behind, and the patch of moorish soil, with the yew- trees and holly-bushes in front.
His brother sits in the seat, and usurps the patrimony, of a better race, the race of Ulfgar of Middleham; but what Norman lord doth not the same?
Her husband, who, when he married her, had no other patrimony than his noble probity, his first-rate ability, and his spotless reputation, wished to possess as much as his wife.
Should I of these the liberty regard, Who, freed, as to their ancient patrimony, Unhumbled, unrepentant, unreformed, Headlong would follow, and to their gods perhaps Of Bethel and of Dan?
While his brother wasted his patrimony and ultimately came to want ("Works and Days", 34 ff.