patronage


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

pa·tron·age

 (pā′trə-nĭj, păt′rə-)
n.
1. The support or encouragement of a patron, as for an institution or cause.
2. Support or encouragement proffered in a condescending manner: Our little establishment has finally been deemed worthy of the bank's patronage.
3. The trade given to a commercial establishment by its customers: Shopkeepers thanked Christmas shoppers for their patronage.
4. Customers or patrons considered as a group; clientele: The grand old hotel has a loyal but demanding patronage.
5.
a. The power to distribute or appoint people to governmental or political positions.
b. The act of distributing or appointing people to such positions.
c. The positions so distributed or filled.
6. The right to grant an ecclesiastical benefice to a member of the clergy.

patronage

(ˈpætrənɪdʒ)
n
1.
a. the support given or custom brought by a patron or patroness
b. the position of a patron
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in politics)
a. the practice of making appointments to office, granting contracts, etc
b. the favours so distributed
3.
a. a condescending manner
b. any kindness done in a condescending way
4. (Anglicanism) Christianity the right to present a clergyman to a benefice

pa•tron•age

(ˈpeɪ trə nɪdʒ, ˈpæ-)

n.
1. the financial support or business provided to a store, hotel, or the like, by customers, clients, or paying guests.
2. patrons collectively; clientele.
3.
a. the power of public officials to make appointments to government jobs or grant other favors to their supporters.
b. the distribution of such jobs or favors.
c. the jobs or favors so distributed.
4. a condescending manner or attitude in granting favors, in dealing with people, etc.; condescension.
5. the encouragement or support of a patron, as toward an artist or institution.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Middle French]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.patronage - the act of providing approval and supportpatronage - the act of providing approval and support; "his vigorous backing of the conservatives got him in trouble with progressives"
approval, approving, blessing - the formal act of approving; "he gave the project his blessing"; "his decision merited the approval of any sensible person"
2.patronage - customers collectively; "they have an upper class clientele"
people - (plural) any group of human beings (men or women or children) collectively; "old people"; "there were at least 200 people in the audience"
3.patronage - a communication that indicates lack of respect by patronizing the recipient
derogation, disparagement, depreciation - a communication that belittles somebody or something
4.patronage - (politics) granting favors or giving contracts or making appointments to office in return for political support
social control - control exerted (actively or passively) by group action
nomenklatura - the system of patronage in communist countries; controlled by committees in the Communist Party
political science, politics, government - the study of government of states and other political units
5.patronage - the business given to a commercial establishment by its customerspatronage - the business given to a commercial establishment by its customers; "even before noon there was a considerable patronage"
business - the volume of commercial activity; "business is good today"; "show me where the business was today"
custom - habitual patronage; "I have given this tailor my custom for many years"
Verb1.patronage - support by being a patron of
maintain, sustain, keep - supply with necessities and support; "She alone sustained her family"; "The money will sustain our good cause"; "There's little to earn and many to keep"
2.patronage - be a regular customer or client of; "We patronize this store"; "Our sponsor kept our art studio going for as long as he could"
nurture, foster - help develop, help grow; "nurture his talents"
keep going, run on - continue uninterrupted; "The disease will run on unchecked"; "The party kept going until 4 A.M."

patronage

noun
1. support, promotion, sponsorship, backing, help, aid, championship, assistance, encouragement, espousal, benefaction Japan is moving into international patronage of the arts.
2. nepotism, bias, favouritism, preferential treatment, partiality a system based on corruption and political patronage
3. condescension, contempt, disdain, snobbery, patronizing, deigning, snobbishness exuding all the patronage that was to be expected from a descendant of doges

patronage

noun
1. Aid or support given by a patron:
aegis, auspice (often used in plural), backing, patronization, sponsorship.
2. The commercial transactions of customers with a supplier:
3. Customers or patrons collectively:
4. The political appointments or jobs that are at the disposal of those in power:
spoil (used in plural).
Slang: pork.
Translations
رِعايَه، مُناصَرَه
mecenášstvípatronát
protektion
asiakaskuntaasiakkaat
pártfogáspatronázsvevőkör
stuîningur velunnara
patronát

patronage

[ˈpætrənɪdʒ] N (= support) → patrocinio m; (= clients) → clientela f; [of the arts] → mecenazgo m; (political) → apoyo m (Rel) → patronato m
under the patronage ofpatrocinado por, bajo los auspicios de

patronage

[ˈpætrənɪdʒ] n (= support) → patronage m, appui m

patronage

n
(= support)Schirmherrschaft f; under the patronage of …unter der Schirmherrschaft von …; his lifelong patronage of the artsseine lebenslange Förderung der Künste
(form, of a shop etc) we enjoy the patronage of …zu unseren Kunden zählen; we thank you for your patronagewir danken Ihnen für Ihr Vertrauen; the attitude of the new sales assistant caused her to withdraw her patronagedas Benehmen des neuen Verkäufers veranlasste sie, dort nicht mehr einzukaufen
(= right to appoint to government jobs)Patronat nt; under (the) patronage ofunter der Schirmherrschaft von
(rare: = condescension) an air of patronageeine gönnerhafte Miene

patronage

[ˈpætrənɪdʒ] n (gen) → patrocinio; (of shop) → frequentazione f
under the patronage of → sotto l'alto patrocinio or patronato di
patronage of the arts → mecenatismo

patron

(ˈpeitrən) noun
1. a person who supports (often with money) an artist, musician, writer, form of art etc. He's a patron of the arts.
2. a (regular) customer of a shop etc. The manager said that he knew all his patrons.
patronage (ˈpӕtrənidʒ) , ((American) ˈpei-) noun
the support given by a patron.
ˈpatronize, ˈpatronise (ˈpӕ-) , ((American) ˈpei-) verb
1. to behave towards (someone) in a way which is kind and friendly but which nevertheless shows that one thinks oneself to be more important, clever etc than that person. He's a nice fellow but he does patronize his assistants.
2. to visit (a shop, theatre, society etc) regularly. That's not a shop I patronize nowadays.
ˈpatronizing, ˈpatronising adjective
ˈpatronizingly, ˈpatronisingly adverb
patron saint
a saint who protects a particular person, group of people, country etc. St Andrew is the patron saint of Scotland.
References in classic literature ?
Patronage does not trouble me when it is well meant.
The hotel was continually losing patronage because of its shabbiness and she thought of herself as also shabby.
These articles Phoebe accordingly supplied, and, as a mark of gratitude for his previous patronage, and a slight super-added morsel after breakfast, put likewise into his hand a whale
But it is proved by the smallness of the school, which I have heard you speak of, as under the patronage of your sister and Mrs.
I am sorry to say that my patronage ends with this; and my interest is hardly more extensive.
The prosperous patronage with which he said it, made him look twice as big as he was, and four times as offensive.
A young man really well deserves constant support and patronage,' looking at the Doctor, 'who makes such sacrifices.
Here, Solomon," said the Squire, with loud patronage.
Could I have hoped to render it worthy of your patronage, the public would at once have seen the propriety of inscribing a work designed to illustrate the domestic antiquities of England, and particularly of our Saxon forefathers, to the learned author of the Essays upon the Horn of King Ulphus, and on the Lands bestowed by him upon the patrimony of St Peter.
The Long Noses form a peculiar company, under the direct patronage of the god Tingou.
Like his friend Li Po, he became a homeless wanderer, but, unlike him, he concealed his brilliant name, obtaining food and patronage for his delightful nameless self alone, and not for his reputation's sake.
At the Louvre, August 10, 1628 The superior of the convent of Bethune will place in the hands of the person who shall present this note to her the novice who entered the convent upon my recommendation and under my patronage.