patroness


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pa·tron·ess

 (pā′trə-nĭs)
n.
1. A woman who supports, protects, or champions someone or something, such as an institution, event, or cause; a sponsor or benefactor.
2. A woman who possesses the right to grant an ecclesiastical benefice to a member of the clergy.
3. A patron saint. See Usage Note at -ess.

patroness

(ˈpeɪtrənˌɛs)
n
1. a woman who sponsors or aids artists, charities, etc; protector or benefactor
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) See patron saint
[see patron]
patronal adj
ˈpatronly adj

pa•tron•ess

(ˈpeɪ trə nɪs)

n.
a woman who protects, supports, or sponsors someone or something.
[1375–1425; late Middle English patronesse female patron saint < Old French]
usage: See -ess.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.patroness - a woman who is a patron or the wife of a patronpatroness - a woman who is a patron or the wife of a patron
sponsor, supporter, patron - someone who supports or champions something
Translations

patroness

[ˈpeɪtrənes] N [of enterprise] → patrocinadora f; [of the arts] → mecenas f

patroness

n (= sponsor)Gönnerin f; patroness of the artsKunstmäzenin f
References in classic literature ?
Rebecca used to mimic her to her face with the most admirable gravity, thereby rendering the imitation doubly piquant to her worthy patroness.
The climate of Canada is not favorable to my kind patroness, and her medical advisers recommend her to winter in London.
But he shook it off before going out again to join his wife at the house of the great lady patroness of Michaelis.
Her husband's quiet tastes irritate her, I think, and she finds it worth while to play the patroness to a group of young poets and painters of advanced ideas and mediocre ability.
Bennet scarcely spoke at all; but when the servants were withdrawn, he thought it time to have some conversation with his guest, and therefore started a subject in which he expected him to shine, by observing that he seemed very fortunate in his patroness.
She was the lady of the manor and the patroness of his school; and then, as I say, he was a very noble-looking man, and probably took her fancy; and, sir, whenever some women set their hearts on a man there's no stopping them.
Instead of falling a sacrifice to an irresistible passion, as once she had fondly flattered herself with expecting,--instead of remaining even for ever with her mother, and finding her only pleasures in retirement and study, as afterwards in her more calm and sober judgment she had determined on,-- she found herself at nineteen, submitting to new attachments, entering on new duties, placed in a new home, a wife, the mistress of a family, and the patroness of a village.
On the other hand, Trabb's boy might worm himself into his intimacy and tell him things; or, reckless and desperate wretch as I knew he could be, might hoot him in the High-street, My patroness, too, might hear of him, and not approve.
Anne, the patroness of the Canadian voyageurs; where they made confession, and offered up their vows, previous to departing on any hazardous expedition.
As she named the Empress, Anna Pavlovna's face suddenly assumed an expression of profound and sincere devotion and respect mingled with sadness, and this occurred every time she mentioned her illustrious patroness.
She is patroness of half a dozen great charitable schemes, she writes very clever articles in the Reviews on the Betterment of the Poor Question, and royalty itself visits at her house.
I have been able to get up but three times, to go to pray to Sainte-Genevieve, our good patroness, and the rest of the time I have been lying on my bed.