patronizing


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pa·tron·ize

 (pā′trə-nīz′, păt′rə-)
tr.v. pa·tron·ized, pa·tron·iz·ing, pa·tron·iz·es
1. To act as a patron to; support or sponsor: donors who patronize the orchestra.
2. To go to as a customer, especially on a regular basis: We patronize the local diner.
3. To treat in a condescending manner, often in showing interest or kindness that is insincere: felt she was being patronized by her supervisor.

pa′tron·i·za′tion (-trə-nĭ-zā′shən) n.
pa′tron·iz′ing·ly adv.

patronizing

(ˈpætrəˌnaɪzɪŋ) or

patronising

adj
having a superior manner; condescending
ˈpatronˌizingly, ˈpatronˌisingly adv
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.patronizing - (used of behavior or attitude) characteristic of those who treat others with condescensionpatronizing - (used of behavior or attitude) characteristic of those who treat others with condescension
superior - of or characteristic of high rank or importance; "a superior ruler"

patronizing

adjective condescending, superior, stooping, lofty, gracious, contemptuous, haughty, snobbish, disdainful, supercilious, toffee-nosed (slang, chiefly Brit.) his patronizing attitude to the homeless
humble, respectful, deferential, servile, obsequious
Translations
blahosklonný
leereszkedõ
sá sem sÿnir yfirlætislega góîvild
büyüklük taslayan

patronizing

[ˈpætrənaɪzɪŋ] ADJ [person, attitude] → condescendiente
a few patronizing remarksunas cuantas observaciones dichas en tono condescendiente

patronizing

[ˈpætrənaɪzɪŋ] patronising (British) adj (= condescending) [person, attitude, tone] → condescendant(e)

patronizing

adjgönnerhaft, herablassend; to be patronizing to or toward(s) somebodyjdn herablassend or von oben herab behandeln; there’s no need to be so patronizingdu brauchst gar nicht so herablassend or von oben herab zu tun

patronizing

[ˈpætrəˌnaɪzɪŋ] adjcondiscendente

patron

(ˈpeitrən) noun
1. a person who supports (often with money) an artist, musician, writer, form of art etc. He's a patron of the arts.
2. a (regular) customer of a shop etc. The manager said that he knew all his patrons.
patronage (ˈpӕtrənidʒ) , ((American) ˈpei-) noun
the support given by a patron.
ˈpatronize, ˈpatronise (ˈpӕ-) , ((American) ˈpei-) verb
1. to behave towards (someone) in a way which is kind and friendly but which nevertheless shows that one thinks oneself to be more important, clever etc than that person. He's a nice fellow but he does patronize his assistants.
2. to visit (a shop, theatre, society etc) regularly. That's not a shop I patronize nowadays.
ˈpatronizing, ˈpatronising adjective
ˈpatronizingly, ˈpatronisingly adverb
patron saint
a saint who protects a particular person, group of people, country etc. St Andrew is the patron saint of Scotland.
References in classic literature ?
Do you dare to suppose, you ridiculous girl, that Mr and Mrs Boffin would enter these doors upon a patronizing errand; or, if they did, would remain within them, only for one single instant, while your mother had the strength yet remaining in her vital frame to request them to depart?
Do you not comprehend that in presuming to hint that this lady and gentleman could have any idea of patronizing any member of your family--I care not which--you accuse them of an impertinence little less than insane?
He was a long, offensive, patronizing person, with a moustache that looked like a smear of charcoal, and a habit of addressing her as 'Ah, little one
But he was so horrid and patronizing to you, I couldn't help scratching.
He adopted toward him an air of patronizing good humor.
But after seeing his brother, listening to his conversation with the professor, hearing afterwards the unconsciously patronizing tone in which his brother questioned him about agricultural matters (their mother's property had not been divided, and Levin took charge of both their shares), Levin felt that he could not for some reason begin to talk to him of his intention of marrying.
And to me they talked in fatherly ways, patronizing my youth and inexperience.
In two days he has adopted a slightly imperious air and patronizing manner.
Pierre who had been regarded with patronizing condescension when he was an illegitimate son, and petted and extolled when he was the best match in Russia, had sunk greatly in the esteem of society after his marriage- when the marriageable daughters and their mothers had nothing to hope from him- especially as he did not know how, and did not wish, to court society's favor.
She endeavored to be nice, but succeeded only in being haughty and patronizing.
On this occasion, Director General of Equestrian Club Adel bin Abdullah Al-Mazroa thanked the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques for patronizing this event which reflects his care and support for this sport.
Pakistan Army has established LGSG, which is spread over 20 acres of land, with a unique aim to provide multiple services ranging from patronizing and encouraging shooting sport to grooming young shooters in the country.