patronizing


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pa·tron·ize

 (pā′trə-nīz′, păt′rə-)
tr.v. pa·tron·ized, pa·tron·iz·ing, pa·tron·iz·es
1. To act as a patron to; support or sponsor: donors who patronize the orchestra.
2. To go to as a customer, especially on a regular basis: We patronize the local diner.
3. To treat in a condescending manner, often in showing interest or kindness that is insincere: felt she was being patronized by her supervisor.

pa′tron·i·za′tion (-trə-nĭ-zā′shən) n.
pa′tron·iz′ing·ly adv.

patronizing

(ˈpætrəˌnaɪzɪŋ) or patronising
adj
1. having a superior manner; condescending
ˈpatronˌizingly ˈpatronˌisingly adv
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.patronizing - (used of behavior or attitude) characteristic of those who treat others with condescensionpatronizing - (used of behavior or attitude) characteristic of those who treat others with condescension
superior - of or characteristic of high rank or importance; "a superior ruler"

patronizing

adjective condescending, superior, stooping, lofty, gracious, contemptuous, haughty, snobbish, disdainful, supercilious, toffee-nosed (slang, chiefly Brit.) his patronizing attitude to the homeless
humble, respectful, deferential, servile, obsequious
Translations

patronizing

[ˈpætrənaɪzɪŋ] ADJ [person, attitude] → condescendiente
a few patronizing remarksunas cuantas observaciones dichas en tono condescendiente

patronizing

[ˈpætrənaɪzɪŋ] patronising (British) adj (= condescending) [person, attitude, tone] → condescendant(e)

patronizing

adjgonnerhaft, herablassend; to be patronizing to or toward(s) somebodyjdn herablassend or von oben herab behandeln; there’s no need to be so patronizingdu brauchst gar nicht so herablassend or von oben herab zu tun

patronizing

[ˈpætrəˌnaɪzɪŋ] adjcondiscendente
References in classic literature ?
But after seeing his brother, listening to his conversation with the professor, hearing afterwards the unconsciously patronizing tone in which his brother questioned him about agricultural matters (their mother's property had not been divided, and Levin took charge of both their shares), Levin felt that he could not for some reason begin to talk to him of his intention of marrying.
He adopted toward him an air of patronizing good humor.
"So gently patronizing, and so 'I-don't-suppose-you-can-help-it,- poor-thing,' in your general style," said Jessie, kissing her.