patronizing


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

pa·tron·ize

 (pā′trə-nīz′, păt′rə-)
tr.v. pa·tron·ized, pa·tron·iz·ing, pa·tron·iz·es
1. To act as a patron to; support or sponsor: donors who patronize the orchestra.
2. To go to as a customer, especially on a regular basis: We patronize the local diner.
3. To treat in a condescending manner, often in showing interest or kindness that is insincere: felt she was being patronized by her supervisor.

pa′tron·i·za′tion (-trə-nĭ-zā′shən) n.
pa′tron·iz′ing·ly adv.

patronizing

(ˈpætrəˌnaɪzɪŋ) or

patronising

adj
having a superior manner; condescending
ˈpatronˌizingly, ˈpatronˌisingly adv
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.patronizing - (used of behavior or attitude) characteristic of those who treat others with condescensionpatronizing - (used of behavior or attitude) characteristic of those who treat others with condescension
superior - of or characteristic of high rank or importance; "a superior ruler"

patronizing

adjective condescending, superior, stooping, lofty, gracious, contemptuous, haughty, snobbish, disdainful, supercilious, toffee-nosed (slang, chiefly Brit.) his patronizing attitude to the homeless
humble, respectful, deferential, servile, obsequious
Translations
blahosklonný
leereszkedõ
sá sem sÿnir yfirlætislega góîvild
büyüklük taslayan

patronizing

[ˈpætrənaɪzɪŋ] ADJ [person, attitude] → condescendiente
a few patronizing remarksunas cuantas observaciones dichas en tono condescendiente

patronizing

[ˈpætrənaɪzɪŋ] patronising (British) adj (= condescending) [person, attitude, tone] → condescendant(e)

patronizing

adjgönnerhaft, herablassend; to be patronizing to or toward(s) somebodyjdn herablassend or von oben herab behandeln; there’s no need to be so patronizingdu brauchst gar nicht so herablassend or von oben herab zu tun

patronizing

[ˈpætrəˌnaɪzɪŋ] adjcondiscendente

patron

(ˈpeitrən) noun
1. a person who supports (often with money) an artist, musician, writer, form of art etc. He's a patron of the arts.
2. a (regular) customer of a shop etc. The manager said that he knew all his patrons.
patronage (ˈpӕtrənidʒ) , ((American) ˈpei-) noun
the support given by a patron.
ˈpatronize, ˈpatronise (ˈpӕ-) , ((American) ˈpei-) verb
1. to behave towards (someone) in a way which is kind and friendly but which nevertheless shows that one thinks oneself to be more important, clever etc than that person. He's a nice fellow but he does patronize his assistants.
2. to visit (a shop, theatre, society etc) regularly. That's not a shop I patronize nowadays.
ˈpatronizing, ˈpatronising adjective
ˈpatronizingly, ˈpatronisingly adverb
patron saint
a saint who protects a particular person, group of people, country etc. St Andrew is the patron saint of Scotland.
References in classic literature ?
We have many most respectable and worthy young women who do the same and are employed by the nobility, because, being the daughters of gentlemen, they are both well bred and accomplished, you know," said Miss Kate in a patronizing tone that hurt Meg's pride, and made her work seem not only more distasteful, but degrading.
So gently patronizing, and so 'I-don't-suppose-you-can-help-it,- poor-thing,' in your general style," said Jessie, kissing her.
On his arrival from the other world, he had merely found it necessary to spend a quarter of an hour at a barber's, who had trimmed down the Puritan's full beard into a pair of grizzled whiskers, then, patronizing a ready-made clothing establishment, he had exchanged his velvet doublet and sable cloak, with the richly worked band under his chin, for a white collar and cravat, coat, vest, and pantaloons; and lastly, putting aside his steel-hilted broadsword to take up a gold-headed cane, the Colonel Pyncheon of two centuries ago steps forward as the Judge of the passing moment!
There's your true Ashantee, gentlemen; there howl your pagans; where you ever find them, next door to you; under the long-flung shadow, and the snug patronizing lee of churches.
Savory morsels of ham, golden blocks of corn-cake, fragments of pie of every conceivable mathematical figure, chicken wings, gizzards, and drumsticks, all appeared in picturesque confusion; and Sam, as monarch of all he surveyed, sat with his palm-leaf cocked rejoicingly to one side, and patronizing Andy at his right hand.
He introduced himself, smiling a smirky smile borrowed from the courtiers of the stage, extended a fair-skinned talon, and while he gripped my hand in it he bent his body forward three times at the hips, as the stage courtier does, and said in the airiest and most condescending and patronizing way--I quite remember his exact language:
She has taken a patronizing fancy to her father, the Admiral, who accepts her condescension gratefully as age brings more and more home to him the futility of his social position.
Come nearer," said the magistrate, with a patronizing wave of the hand, "and tell me to what circumstance I owe the honor of this visit.
He adopted toward him an air of patronizing good humor.
That is a child's reason, Monsieur Blaisois," said Musqueton in his most patronizing manner.
His little friends, like all other small people, had a great opinion of their own importance, and used to assume quite a patronizing air towards the Giant.
Nay, I was just as jealous of my brother as before--just as much irritated by his small patronizing ways; for my pride, my diseased sensibility, were there as they had always been, and winced as inevitably under every offence as my eye winced from an intruding mote.