patronizingly


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pa·tron·ize

 (pā′trə-nīz′, păt′rə-)
tr.v. pa·tron·ized, pa·tron·iz·ing, pa·tron·iz·es
1. To act as a patron to; support or sponsor: donors who patronize the orchestra.
2. To go to as a customer, especially on a regular basis: We patronize the local diner.
3. To treat in a condescending manner, often in showing interest or kindness that is insincere: felt she was being patronized by her supervisor.

pa′tron·i·za′tion (-trə-nĭ-zā′shən) n.
pa′tron·iz′ing·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.patronizingly - with condescension; in a patronizing manner; "he treats his secretary condescendingly"
Translations
blahosklonně
meî yfirlætislegri góîvild
büyüklük taslar biçimde

patronizingly

[ˈpætrənaɪzɪŋlɪ] ADVcon condescendencia

patronizingly

[ˈpætrənaɪzɪŋli] patronisingly (British) adv [speak, say] (= condescendingly) → avec condescendancepatron of the arts nmécène mpatron saint nsaint(e) patron(ne) m/f

patronizingly

advgönnerhaft, herablassend; a patronizingly tolerant attitudeherablassende Nachsicht

patronizingly

[ˈpætrəˌnaɪzɪŋlɪ] advcon condiscendenza

patron

(ˈpeitrən) noun
1. a person who supports (often with money) an artist, musician, writer, form of art etc. He's a patron of the arts.
2. a (regular) customer of a shop etc. The manager said that he knew all his patrons.
patronage (ˈpӕtrənidʒ) , ((American) ˈpei-) noun
the support given by a patron.
ˈpatronize, ˈpatronise (ˈpӕ-) , ((American) ˈpei-) verb
1. to behave towards (someone) in a way which is kind and friendly but which nevertheless shows that one thinks oneself to be more important, clever etc than that person. He's a nice fellow but he does patronize his assistants.
2. to visit (a shop, theatre, society etc) regularly. That's not a shop I patronize nowadays.
ˈpatronizing, ˈpatronising adjective
ˈpatronizingly, ˈpatronisingly adverb
patron saint
a saint who protects a particular person, group of people, country etc. St Andrew is the patron saint of Scotland.
References in classic literature ?
so comforting to the love-sick young sprig who looks down patronizingly at some poor devil with a white starved face and thinks to himself, "Ah, how happy you are compared with me
You are a good little man,' said the angel, patronizingly.
Poulter only shook his head in a significant manner at this request, and smiled patronizingly, as Jupiter may have done when Semele urged her too ambitious request.
For they are the public chroniclers of such inquiries by the line; and he is not superior to the universal human infirmity, but hopes to read in print what "Mooney, the active and intelligent beadle of the district," said and did and even aspires to see the name of Mooney as familiarly and patronizingly mentioned as the name of the hangman is, according to the latest examples.
They're well enough," answered East, patronizingly, "only uncommon cold at nights sometimes.
She nodded twice or thrice patronizingly to the little boy, who looked up from his dinner or from the pictures of soldiers he was painting.
You don't know what it is to love," said Henrietta, plaintively, and yet patronizingly.
When US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley patronizingly ticks off the Palestinian president for rejecting the theft of Jerusalem, this insults the dignity of all Palestinians.
Mansplaining, for those who have lived with their heads in the sand for the past few years, is when men patronizingly explain obvious concepts to women, often things the woman is more qualified to talk about than the man.
Teens will particularly appreciate how the adults never speak patronizingly to the young investigator.
Unlike Bing Crosby's Father O'Malley, the priest at the penitentiary is unable to patronizingly order Prejean to do what is best for her (as much as he may wish it otherwise).
However, "month after month there was no sign of pay--instead, the schools and the Ministry of Education threw more and more random paperwork at me while I was patronizingly told to be patienta[bar].