pauper


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

pau·per

 (pô′pər)
n.
1. One who is extremely poor.
2. One living on or eligible for public charity.

[From Latin, poor; see pau- in Indo-European roots.]

pauper

(ˈpɔːpə)
n
1. a person who is extremely poor
2. (Historical Terms) (formerly) a destitute person supported by public charity
[C16: from Latin: poor]
ˈpauperˌism n

pau•per

(ˈpɔ pər)

n.
1. a person without any personal means of support.
2. a very poor person.
[1485–95; < Latin: poor]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pauper - a person who is very poorpauper - a person who is very poor    
beggar, mendicant - a pauper who lives by begging
derelict - a person without a home, job, or property
have-not, poor person - a person with few or no possessions
starveling - someone who is starving (or being starved)

pauper

pauper

noun
An impoverished person:
Translations
فَقير جدا
-čkanuzákžebrák
subsistensløs
fátæklingur; ölmusumaîur
beturtis
nabagsubags
bedár
çok yoksul kimse

pauper

[ˈpɔːpəʳ] Npobre mf, indigente mf
pauper's gravefosa f común

pauper

[ˈpɔːpər] nindigent(e) m/f pauper's gravepauper's grave nfosse f commune

pauper

nArme(r) mf; (supported by charity) → Almosenempfänger(in) m(f); pauper’s graveArmengrab nt

pauper

[ˈpɔːpəʳ] nindigente m/f
pauper's grave → fossa comune

pauper

(ˈpoːpə) noun
a very poor person. Her husband died a pauper.
References in classic literature ?
None so ready as she to give of her little substance to every demand of poverty, even though the bitter-hearted pauper threw back a gibe in requital of the food brought regularly to his door, or the garments wrought for him by the fingers that could have embroidered a monarch's robe.
In this world, shipmates, sin that pays its way can travel freely, and without a passport; whereas Virtue, if a pauper, is stopped at all frontiers.
In this sordid place, and clothed, bedded, and fed like a pauper, this strange princess lived and worshiped during two years, and in it she died.
She gathered up her baby once more; but when her eye fell upon its miserably short little gray tow-linen shirt and noted the contrast between its pauper shabbiness and her own volcanic eruption of infernal splendors, her mother-heart was touched, and she was ashamed.
I would as soon have been charged with a pauper brat out of a workhouse: but he was weak, naturally weak.
The furniture of the room was old-fashioned and dusty; and the green baize on the top of the writing-table had lost all its colour, and was as withered and pale as an old pauper.
What with mortgages and arrears, I'm as short o' cash as a roadside pauper.
Senor," replied the youth, "in this bundle I carry velvet pantaloons to match this jacket; if I wear them out on the road, I shall not be able to make a decent appearance in them in the city, and I have not the wherewithal to buy others; and so for this reason, as well as to keep myself cool, I am making my way in this fashion to overtake some companies of infantry that are not twelve leagues off, in which I shall enlist, and there will be no want of baggage trains to travel with after that to the place of embarkation, which they say will be Carthagena; I would rather have the King for a master, and serve him in the wars, than serve a court pauper.
He becomes a pauper, and pauperism develops more rapidly than population and wealth.
True, he is a pauper, and nothing but a pauper; but, at least he is an HONOURABLE pauper.
But presently Dent brings up a poor fellow who has killed a hare, and when I've got through my 'justicing,' as Carroll calls it, I'm inclined for a ride round the glebe, and on my way back I meet with the master of the workhouse, who has got a long story of a mutinous pauper to tell me; and so the day goes on, and I'm always the same lazy fellow before evening sets in.
If a shaggy pauper had a right to bed and board and wages and a vote, women, of course, who were weaker than paupers, and whose physical tissue was in itself an appeal, should be maintained, sentimentally, at the public expense.