pauper

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Related to pauperised: pauperdom

pau·per

 (pô′pər)
n.
1. One who is extremely poor.
2. One living on or eligible for public charity.

[From Latin, poor; see pau- in Indo-European roots.]

pauper

(ˈpɔːpə)
n
1. a person who is extremely poor
2. (Historical Terms) (formerly) a destitute person supported by public charity
[C16: from Latin: poor]
ˈpauperˌism n

pau•per

(ˈpɔ pər)

n.
1. a person without any personal means of support.
2. a very poor person.
[1485–95; < Latin: poor]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pauper - a person who is very poorpauper - a person who is very poor    
beggar, mendicant - a pauper who lives by begging
derelict - a person without a home, job, or property
have-not, poor person - a person with few or no possessions
starveling - someone who is starving (or being starved)

pauper

pauper

noun
An impoverished person:
Translations
فَقير جدا
-čkanuzákžebrák
subsistensløs
fátæklingur; ölmusumaîur
beturtis
nabagsubags
bedár
çok yoksul kimse

pauper

[ˈpɔːpəʳ] Npobre mf, indigente mf
pauper's gravefosa f común

pauper

[ˈpɔːpər] nindigent(e) m/f pauper's gravepauper's grave nfosse f commune

pauper

nArme(r) mf; (supported by charity) → Almosenempfänger(in) m(f); pauper’s graveArmengrab nt

pauper

[ˈpɔːpəʳ] nindigente m/f
pauper's grave → fossa comune

pauper

(ˈpoːpə) noun
a very poor person. Her husband died a pauper.
References in periodicals archive ?
He was a pauperised small farmer from Uttar Pradesh.
Alun G Williams This old fool will be dead in 10 years' time (particularly if reliant on his Tories and their ideas on the NHS), while our youngsters will be living in an insular pauperised society.
The way of life of the more 'urbanised' displaced returnees is perceived as a loss of authenticity whilst those who stayed, who have often been pauperised, are labelled as 'seekers of social benefits unable to adapt to new life circumstances'.
Americans are Americans, whether they are fresh-off-the-boat, pauperised Syrian refugees in 2016, or fresh-off-the-Mayflower separatist Pilgrims in 1620.
Over the next five years many of those who are viewing the poor with disdain will themselves be pauperised by austerity and this will be a hard lesson to learn.
The feud had not only pauperised them but buried both under a mountain of debt.