pauperism


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

pau·per·ism

 (pô′pə-rĭz′əm)
n.
The quality or state of being a pauper.

pauperism

the state or condition of utter poverty. Also called pauperage.
See also: Poverty
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pauperism - a state of extreme poverty or destitution; "their indigence appalled him"; "a general state of need exists among the homeless"
impoverishment, poorness, poverty - the state of having little or no money and few or no material possessions
mendicancy, mendicity, beggary - the state of being a beggar or mendicant; "they were reduced to mendicancy"
Translations

pauperism

[ˈpɔːpərɪzəm] Npauperismo m

pauperism

n (lit, fig)Armut f
References in classic literature ?
He becomes a pauper, and pauperism develops more rapidly than population and wealth.
Such a view would have been wrong there and then, and would, of course, be still more wrong now and in England; for as man moves northward the material necessities of life become of more vital importance, and our society is infinitely more complex, and displays far greater extremes of luxury and pauperism than any society of the antique world.
But as this phrase happened to bear an unfortunate resemblance to the popular expression of 'coming on the parish,' it suggested to Mr Willet's mind no more consolatory visions than pauperism on an extensive scale, and ruin in a capacious aspect.
The Secretary looked on from a doorway at the boofer lady thus encircled, and still looked on at the boofer lady standing alone there, when the determined old figure with its steady bright eyes was trudging through the streets, away from paralysis and pauperism.
Tulliver to provide for his wife and daughter without any assistance from his wife's relations, and without that too evident descent into pauperism which makes it annoying to respectable people to meet the degraded member of the family by the wayside.
And be astonished if you can at the pauperism and the crimes that now disgrace this once happy and Moral England.
Policy makers and intellectuals generally accepted as fact the claim made in Frederick Hoffman's The Race Traits and Tendencies of the American Negro that "crime, pauperism, and sexual immorality" among blacks were biologically determined.
nursery of destitute poverty and thriftlessness, demoralised pauperism, as a community cast adrift from the salutary presence and leadership of men and wealth and culture, and as a potential threat to the riches and civilisation of London and the Empire.
The theory of pauperism was that crime was a result of the "undeserving" poor, who were in poverty because of their wicked ways.
Racist social workers argued that the Blacks had naturally lower standards of living, thus masking the extent of their "true pauperism.
He found that in the "dwarf economy" of the Rhineland, where the parceling of land had been carried to its extremes, pauperism was highest and the pilfering of wood the greatest, though these high rates did not hold for other types of crimes "against property" (Valentini 1869, 58).
26) The Our Towns report defined the "problem family" as "always on the edge of pauperism and crime, riddled with mental and physical defects, in and out of the Courts for child neglect, [and] a menace to the community" later noting that "it is a serious matter that no study of this class of the population exists.