pavement


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pave·ment

 (pāv′mənt)
n.
1.
a. A hard smooth surface, especially of a public area or thoroughfare, that will bear travel.
b. The material with which such a surface is made.
2. Chiefly British A sidewalk.

pavement

(ˈpeɪvmənt)
n
1. (Civil Engineering) a hard-surfaced path for pedestrians alongside and a little higher than a road. US and Canadian word: sidewalk
2. (Civil Engineering) a paved surface, esp one that is a thoroughfare
3. (Civil Engineering) the material used in paving
4. (Civil Engineering) civil engineering the hard layered structure that forms a road carriageway, airfield runway, vehicle park, or other paved areas
5. (Geological Science) geology a level area of exposed rock resembling a paved road. See limestone pavement
[C13: from Latin pavīmentum a hard floor, from pavīre to beat hard]

pave•ment

(ˈpeɪv mənt)

n.
1. a paved road, highway, etc.
2. a paved surface, ground covering, or floor.
3. a material used for paving.
4. Atlantic States and Brit. sidewalk.
[1250–1300]

pavement

sidewalk
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pavement - the paved surface of a thoroughfarepavement - the paved surface of a thoroughfare
curbside - the side of a sidewalk that is bordered by a curb; "policemen stood at intervals along the curbside"
paved surface - a level horizontal surface covered with paving material
paving stone - a stone used for paving
road, route - an open way (generally public) for travel or transportation
sidewalk, pavement - walk consisting of a paved area for pedestrians; usually beside a street or roadway
street - a thoroughfare (usually including sidewalks) that is lined with buildings; "they walked the streets of the small town"; "he lives on Nassau Street"
2.pavement - material used to pave an areapavement - material used to pave an area  
artefact, artifact - a man-made object taken as a whole
asphalt - mixed asphalt and crushed gravel or sand; used especially for paving but also for roofing
concrete - a strong hard building material composed of sand and gravel and cement and water
blacktop, blacktopping - a black bituminous material used for paving roads or other areas; usually spread over crushed rock
macadam - broken stone used in macadamized roadways
tarmac, tarmacadam - a paving material of tar and broken stone; mixed in a factory and shaped during paving
3.pavement - walk consisting of a paved area for pedestrianspavement - walk consisting of a paved area for pedestrians; usually beside a street or roadway
pavement, paving - the paved surface of a thoroughfare
paseo, walkway, walk - a path set aside for walking; "after the blizzard he shoveled the front walk"

pavement

noun sidewalk (U.S. & Canad.), footpath (Austral. & N.Z.) He was hurrying along the pavement.
Translations
chodníkdlažbavozovka
fortov
jalkakäytävä
pločnik
gangstétt
歩道
인도
pločnik
trottoar
ทางเดินเท้า
vỉa hè

pavement

[ˈpeɪvmənt]
A. N (Brit) → acera f, vereda f (LAm), andén m (CAm, Col), banqueta f (Mex) (US) → calzada f, pavimento m
brick pavementenladrillado m
stone pavementempedrado m, adoquinado m
to leave the pavement (US) (Aut) → salir de la calzada
B. CPD pavement artist Npintor(a) m/f callejero/a
pavement café Ncafé m con terraza, café m al aire libre

pavement

[ˈpeɪvmənt] n
(British)trottoir m
(US)chaussée fpavement artist n (British)artiste mf de ruepavement café n (British)café m avec terrasse (sur le trottoir)

pavement

n (Brit) → Gehsteig m, → Bürgersteig m, → Trottoir nt; (US: = paved road) → Straße f; (= material)Bodenbelag m; to leave the pavement (US Aut) → von der Straße abkommen; pavement artistPflastermaler(in) m(f)

pavement

[ˈpeɪvmənt] n (Brit) → marciapiede m (Am) → pavimentazione f stradale

pave

(peiv) verb
to cover (a street, path etc) with (usually large) flat stones, concrete etc to make a flat surface for walking on etc. He wants to pave the garden.
ˈpavement noun
(American ˈsidewalk) a paved surface, especially a paved footpath along the sides of a road for people to walk on.
ˈpaving-stone noun
a large flat stone or piece of concrete used for paving.

pavement

رَصِّيفٌ chodník fortov Bürgersteig πεζοδρόμιο pavimento jalkakäytävä trottoir pločnik marciapiede 歩道 인도 bestrating fortau chodnik calçada, passeio тротуар trottoar ทางเดินเท้า kaldırım vỉa hè 人行道
References in classic literature ?
Half the sky was chequered with black thunderheads, but all the west was luminous and clear: in the lightning flashes it looked like deep blue water, with the sheen of moonlight on it; and the mottled part of the sky was like marble pavement, like the quay of some splendid seacoast city, doomed to destruction.
She did not want them to be wholly "children of the pavement," she always said when begging to have them for a space.
Thorndike, unaccustomed to cross the pavement to his office unless escorted by bank messengers and plain-clothes men, felt the room growing rapidly smaller; the figure of the truculent Greek loomed to heroic proportions.
Well advanced as Hepzibah was, she could not remember when Uncle Venner, as the neighborhood called him, had not gone up and down the street, stooping a little and drawing his feet heavily over the gravel or pavement.
The pavement round about the above-described edifice -- which we may as well name at once as the Custom-House of the port -- has grass enough growing in its chinks to show that it has not, of late days, been worn by any multitudinous resort of business.
Further on, from the bright red windows of the Sword-Fish Inn, there came such fervent rays, that it seemed to have melted the packed snow and ice from before the house, for everywhere else the congealed frost lay ten inches thick in a hard, asphaltic pavement, --rather weary for me, when I struck my foot against the flinty projections, because from hard, remorseless service the soles of my boots were in a most miserable plight.
I well remember one morning, as we were on the stand waiting for a fare, that a young man, carrying a heavy portmanteau, trod on a piece of orange peel which lay on the pavement, and fell down with great force.
The moment the bells stopped, those banked masses broke and poured over the line like a vast black wave, and for as much as a half hour it continued to flow, and then it solidified itself, and you could have walked upon a pavement of human heads to -- well, miles.
In New York these performances would have gathered a mighty crowd of curious and intensely interested spectators; but here it only captured an audience of half a dozen little boys who stood in a row across the pavement, some with their school-knapsacks on their backs and their hands in their pockets, others with arms full of bundles, and all absorbed in the show.
He then stepped across the pavement to her, and said something: she seemed embarrassed, and desirous of getting away; to prevent it, he laid his hand on her arm.
They stood back from the pavement, separated from it by little strips of garden-ground.
The crippling stones of the pavement, with their many little reservoirs of mud and water, had no footways, but broke off abruptly at the doors.