paying


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pay 1

 (pā)
v. paid (pād), pay·ing, pays
v.tr.
1. To give money to in return for goods or services rendered: pay the cashier.
2. To give (money) in exchange for goods or services: paid four dollars for a hamburger; paid an hourly wage.
3. To discharge or settle (a debt or obligation): paying taxes; paid the bill.
4. To bear (a cost or penalty, for example) in recompense: She paid the price for her unpopular opinions.
5. To yield as a return: a savings plan that paid six percent interest.
6. To afford an advantage to; profit: It paid us to be generous.
7. To give or bestow: paying compliments; paying attention.
8. To make (a visit or call).
9. Past tense and past participle paid or payed (pād) To let out (a line or cable) by slackening.
v.intr.
1. To give money in exchange for goods or services.
2. To discharge a debt or obligation.
3. To bear a cost or penalty in recompense: You'll pay for this mischief!
4. To be profitable or worthwhile: It doesn't pay to get angry.
adj.
1. Of, relating to, giving, or receiving payments.
2. Requiring payment to use or operate: a pay toilet.
3. Yielding valuable metal in mining: a pay streak.
n.
1. The act of paying or state of being paid.
2. Money given in return for work done; salary; wages.
3.
a. Recompense or reward: Your thanks are pay enough.
b. Retribution or punishment.
4. Paid employment: the workers in our pay.
5. A person considered with regard to his or her credit or reliability in discharging debts.
Phrasal Verbs:
pay back
1. To pay or return (what is owed as a debt).
2. To repay (a person who is owed a debt).
3. To give recompense to; reward: How can we ever pay you back for what you've done for us?
4. To reciprocate; return: pay back a kindness.
5. To retaliate against or get revenge upon.
pay down
To reduce (a debt) through payment.
pay off
1. To pay the full amount on (a debt).
2. To result in profit or advantage; succeed: Your efforts will eventually pay off.
3. To pay the wages due to (an employee) upon discharge.
4. To pay (a plaintiff) to settle a lawsuit out of court.
5. To bribe.
6. Nautical To turn or cause to turn (a vessel) to leeward.
pay out
1. To give (money) out; spend.
2. To let out (a line or rope) by slackening.
pay up
To give over the full monetary amount demanded.
Idioms:
pay (one's) dues
To earn a given right or position through hard work, long-term experience, or suffering: She paid her dues in small-town theaters before being cast in a Broadway play.
pay (one's) way
To contribute one's own share; pay for oneself.
pay the piper
To bear the consequences of something.
pay through the nose Informal
To pay excessively.

[Middle English paien, from Old French paiier, from Late Latin pācāre, to appease, from Latin, to pacify, subdue, from pāx, pāc-, peace; see pag- in Indo-European roots.]

pay 2

 (pā)
tr.v. payed or paid (pād), pay·ing, pays
To coat or cover (seams of a ship, for example) with waterproof material such as tar or asphalt.

[Obsolete French peier, from Old French, from Latin picāre, from pix, pic-, pitch.]

paying

(ˈpeɪɪŋ)
adj
giving money (in exchange for goods, services, etc)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.paying - yielding a fair profit
profitable - yielding material gain or profit; "profitable speculation on the stock market"
2.paying - for which money is paid; "a paying job"; "remunerative work"; "salaried employment"; "stipendiary services"
paid - marked by the reception of pay; "paid work"; "a paid official"; "a paid announcement"; "a paid check"
Translations

paying

[ˈpeɪɪŋ]
A. ADJprovechoso, rentable
it's a paying propositiones un negocio provechoso
B. CPD paying bank Nbanco m pagador
paying guest Nhuésped(a) m/f (de pago), pensionista mf

paying

[ˈpeɪɪŋ] adj [customer, passenger, audience] → payant(e)paying guest nhôte mf payantpaying-in slip nbordereau m de versement

paying

adj
(= profitable)rentabel
paying guestzahlender Gast; paying patientPrivatpatient(in) m(f)

paying

[ˈpeɪɪŋ] adj (business, scheme) → redditizio/a
Paying   
References in classic literature ?
They all liked Jo immensely, but never fell in love with her, though very few escaped without paying the tribute of a sentimental sigh or two at Amy's shrine.
He looked hard at the child and began to address her, paying no more at- tention to the father.
She waved a dissenting hand, and went on, paying no further heed to their renewed cries which sought to detain her.
A truant provincial was paying the forfeit of his disobedience, by being plundered of those very effects which had caused him to desert his place in the ranks.
Well, I rather thought that--that young Kearney was paying considerable attention to--to--to Jessie," replied her father, with hesitating gravity.
Again, I always go to sea as a sailor, because they make a point of paying me for my trouble, whereas they never pay passengers a single penny that I ever heard of.
Still others, worse yet, would crowd about the bar, and at the expense of the host drink themselves sodden, paying not the least attention to any one, and leaving it to be thought that either they had danced with the bride already, or meant to later on.
Clare turned round from paying the hackman, there was nobody in view but Mr.
I have never declined paying the highway tax, because I am as desirous of being a good neighbor as I am of being a bad subject; and as for supporting schools, I am doing my part to educate my fellow countrymen now.
But it seems to me that the purchaser does all the paying, even then.
The price of the paper was two dollars a year, but he took in three subscriptions for half a dollar apiece on con- dition of them paying him in advance; they were going to pay in cordwood and onions as usual, but he said he had just bought the concern and knocked down the price as low as he could afford it, and was going to run it for cash.
Mother says aunt Mirandy won't want to buy things like those when she's feeding and clothing me and paying for my school books.