peak oil


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peak oil

n.
The point at which peak output of all of Earth's petroleum is reached, calculated as the time when 50 percent of reserves have been depleted.
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The International Energy Agency (IEA) while confirming ample oil resources says: "A combination of sustained high prices and energy policies aimed at greater end-use efficiency and diversification in energy supplies might actually mean that peak oil demand occurs in the future before the resource base is anything like exhausted.
And while environmental groups may take OPEC's statement as a confirmation that the group is acknowledging the threat which oil may pose to the environment and resignation that oil may be on its way out the door, it is important to point out that this particular forecast for peak oil demand is one of a few, and is only considered a Plan B.
Peak oil demand in cars slows the growth rate over the period," said the report.
As a long-time proponent of the peak oil notion, I can be expected to have a certain bias on this matter.
Before plunging deeper into the IEA's assessment, let's take a quick look at peak oil theory itself.
BGreen looks at the concept of peak oil and what that means for resource efficiency in the industry
Peak oil will not come in the near future, El-Badri said, referring to the theory than eventually a point in time will arrive when total world production will start to decline from the highest level it will ever reach.
There may be vast amounts of oil waiting to be unlocked from shale deposits, which could help defer concerns about peak oil farther in the future.
Now he is preparing to lead the fight for wind farms and tidal energy in Wales 12-13 PEAK OIL Rin Simpson meets the people preparing for the day when the world's oil production starts to decline 16-17 UPCYCLING For the green shopper, there are plenty of smart things you can buy that have been made of out reused materials 20-21 GREEN FAMILY The Clarkes began leading a greener way of life three years ago.
Peak oil theorists, notably experts like Colin Campbell, have argued that the supermassive oilfields that drove the world economy for decades were heading for exhaustion.
After starting with three well-organized chapters linking an end to global economic growth with peak oil and other environmental limits, the narrative ventures into anecdotal arguments about the limits of human innovation.
In the second, the author interrogates eleven different claims about everything from peak oil and the circumstances surrounding its extraction and trade.