purl

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Related to pearls: Pearls Before Swine

purl 1

 (pûrl)
intr.v. purled, purl·ing, purls
To flow or ripple with a murmuring sound.
n.
The sound made by rippling water.

[Probably of Scandinavian origin.]

purl 2

also pearl  (pûrl)
v. purled, purl·ing, purls also pearled or pearl·ing or pearls
v.tr.
1. To knit (yarn) with a purl stitch.
2. To edge or finish (a handkerchief, for example) with lace or embroidery.
v.intr.
1. To do knitting with a purl stitch.
2. To edge or finish with lace or embroidery.
n.
1. Abbr. p. Inversion of a knit stitch; purl stitch.
2. A decorative edging of lace or embroidery.
3. Gold or silver wire used in embroidery.

[Origin unknown.]

purl

(pɜːl)
n
1. (Knitting & Sewing) Also called: purl stitch a knitting stitch made by doing a plain stitch backwards
2. (Knitting & Sewing) a decorative border, as of lace
3. (Knitting & Sewing) gold or silver wire thread
vb
4. (Knitting & Sewing) to knit (a row or garment) in purl stitch
5. (Knitting & Sewing) to edge (something) with a purl
Also (for senses 2, 3, 5): pearl
[C16: from dialect pirl to twist into a cord]

purl

(pɜːl)
vb
(Physical Geography) (intr) (of a stream, etc) to flow with a gentle curling or rippling movement and a murmuring sound
n
1. (Physical Geography) a curling movement of water; eddy
2. (Physical Geography) a murmuring sound, as of a shallow stream
[C16: related to Norwegian purla to bubble]

purl1

(pɜrl)

n.
1. a basic stitch in knitting, the reverse of the knit, formed by pulling a loop of the working yarn back through an existing stitch and then slipping that stitch off the needle.
2. one of a series of small loops along the edge of lace braid.
3. a twisted gold or silver embroidery thread.
v.i.
4. to knit with a purl stitch.
v.t.
5. to make with this stitch.
6. to finish with loops or a looped edging.
[1520–30; variant of obsolete or dial. pirl to twist (threads, etc.) into a cord]

purl2

(pɜrl)

v.
1. to flow with curling or rippling motion, as a shallow stream over stones.
2. to flow with a murmuring sound.
n.
3. the action or sound of purling.
4. a ripple or eddy.
[1545–55; orig. uncertain; compare Norwegian purla to bubble up, gush]

Purl

 a small rill in which waters are in a whirl of agitation.
Examples: purl of her sweet breath, 1850; of lace; of water, 1552; of youthful blood, 1650; purls flowering from the fountain of life, 1650.

purl


Past participle: purled
Gerund: purling

Imperative
purl
purl
Present
I purl
you purl
he/she/it purls
we purl
you purl
they purl
Preterite
I purled
you purled
he/she/it purled
we purled
you purled
they purled
Present Continuous
I am purling
you are purling
he/she/it is purling
we are purling
you are purling
they are purling
Present Perfect
I have purled
you have purled
he/she/it has purled
we have purled
you have purled
they have purled
Past Continuous
I was purling
you were purling
he/she/it was purling
we were purling
you were purling
they were purling
Past Perfect
I had purled
you had purled
he/she/it had purled
we had purled
you had purled
they had purled
Future
I will purl
you will purl
he/she/it will purl
we will purl
you will purl
they will purl
Future Perfect
I will have purled
you will have purled
he/she/it will have purled
we will have purled
you will have purled
they will have purled
Future Continuous
I will be purling
you will be purling
he/she/it will be purling
we will be purling
you will be purling
they will be purling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been purling
you have been purling
he/she/it has been purling
we have been purling
you have been purling
they have been purling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been purling
you will have been purling
he/she/it will have been purling
we will have been purling
you will have been purling
they will have been purling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been purling
you had been purling
he/she/it had been purling
we had been purling
you had been purling
they had been purling
Conditional
I would purl
you would purl
he/she/it would purl
we would purl
you would purl
they would purl
Past Conditional
I would have purled
you would have purled
he/she/it would have purled
we would have purled
you would have purled
they would have purled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.purl - gold or silver wire threadpurl - gold or silver wire thread    
thread, yarn - a fine cord of twisted fibers (of cotton or silk or wool or nylon etc.) used in sewing and weaving
2.purl - a basic knitting stitchpurl - a basic knitting stitch    
knitting stitch - a stitch taken in knitting
Verb1.purl - flow in a circular current, of liquids
course, flow, run, feed - move along, of liquids; "Water flowed into the cave"; "the Missouri feeds into the Mississippi"
2.purl - make a murmuring sound; "the water was purling"
make noise, noise, resound - emit a noise
3.purl - knit with a purl stitch
handicraft - a craft that requires skillful hands
knit - make (textiles) by knitting; "knit a scarf"
4.purl - edge or border with gold or silver embroidery
broider, embroider - decorate with needlework
purl - embroider with gold or silver thread
5.purl - embroider with gold or silver thread
broider, embroider - decorate with needlework
purl - edge or border with gold or silver embroidery
Translations
غَرْزَة مَعْكوسَة الحِياكَه
oko obrace
vrangmaske
fordított szem
brugîningur
išvirkščia akis
kreiliskais valdziņš
obrátené očko
ters örgü

purl

[pɜːl]
A. Npunto m del revés
B. VThacer punto del revés
"purl two""dos del revés"

purl

[ˈpɜːrl]

purl

nlinke Masche; is the next row (in) purl?ist die nächste Reihe links?
vtlinks stricken; purl twozwei links
vilinks stricken

purl

[pɜːl]
1. n(maglia or punto a) rovescio

purl

(pəːl) noun
a kind of knitting stitch.
References in classic literature ?
By-and-by a diver came down, and the mermaid said, `I'll give you a box of pearls if you can take it up, ' for she wanted to restore the poor things to life, and couldn't raise the heavy load herself.
For example, an uncle--who had sailed for India fifty years before, and never been heard of since--might yet return, and adopt her to be the comfort of his very extreme and decrepit age, and adorn her with pearls, diamonds, and Oriental shawls and turbans, and make her the ultimate heiress of his unreckonable riches.
I could not rouse the man; so I said we would take him to her, and see -- to the bride who was the fairest thing in the earth to him, once -- roses, pearls, and dew made flesh, for him; a wonder-work, the master-work of nature: with eyes like no other eyes, and voice like no other voice, and a freshness, and lithe young grace, and beauty, that belonged properly to the creatures of dreams -- as he thought -- and to no other.
Elton, as elegant as lace and pearls could make her, he looked at in silence wanting only to observe enough for Isabella's informationbut Miss Fairfax was an old acquaintance and a quiet girl, and he could talk to her.
The ivory, the gold, and the pearls, all received their appointment, and the gentleman having named the last day on which his existence could be continued without the possession of the toothpick-case, drew on his gloves with leisurely care, and bestowing another glance on the Miss Dashwoods, but such a one as seemed rather to demand than express admiration, walked off with a happy air of real conceit and affected indifference.
No, I will not have the nurse," so magnificently that Mary could not help remembering how the young native Prince had looked with his diamonds and emeralds and pearls stuck all over him and the great rubies on the small dark hand he had waved to command his servants to approach with salaams and receive his orders.
Barkis had some general ideas about pearls, which never resolved themselves into anything definite.
Certainly, we couldn't find a prettier place; but it's a long way," I replied, looking up at the sky, all roses and pearls,--"a long way from the Morning Star to the Moon.
If, therefore, my dear friend, you have generosity enough to pardon the presumptuous attempt, to frame for myself a minstrel coronet, partly out of the pearls of pure antiquity, and partly from the Bristol stones and paste, with which I have endeavoured to imitate them, I am convinced your opinion of the difficulty of the task will reconcile you to the imperfect manner of its execution.
Here the gray walked in first, beckoning me to attend: I waited in the second room, and got ready my presents for the master and mistress of the house; they were two knives, three bracelets of false pearls, a small looking-glass, and a bead necklace.
On one occasion he took up the study of jewels, and appeared at a costume ball as Anne de Joyeuse, Admiral of France, in a dress covered with five hundred and sixty pearls.
But suddenly Christine's eyes moistened and two great tears trickled, like two pearls, down her ivory cheeks.