peascod


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pease·cod

also peas·cod  (pēz′kŏd′)
n.
Archaic The pod of the pea.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Piper Eric, to Cabral Lawrence, 1170 Peascod Dr, Eugene, 97402; $245,000.
It transpires, however, that John Perrins senior had an older brother named Thomas, born in 1791, who started a gunmaking business at 80 Peascod Street in Windsor in 1843.
But here was Graham Oldroyd, student of Alan Peascod, who exposed his students to lustres, a revelation to Stern; Oldroyd and Peascod had studied Arabic lustre with Professor Said El-Sadr, in his studio in Fostat, Cairo, Egypt and also with Alan Caiger-Smith.
Captain Astrid (as opposed to Ahab) is accompanied by a girl Isabel (rather than the book's Ishmael) and they sail on the Peascod (not the Pequod).
But as she cradled Sylvie at home, new owner Beverley Peascod said the family has no regrets about rehoming their "priceless" pet.
Bev Peascod, of Carlisle, fell in love with stray dog Sylvie in Greece.
The charges relate to a robbery which took place at Berrys, Peascod Street, Windsor, shortly before 2pm on Monday, during which offenders allegedly threatened staff with a firearm and stole several high-value watches.
One plot, The Dead Man's Fortune, contains the first reference to 'Pantaloon' in the English language and provides the rough outline for a commedia-style plot: Pantaloon, who is attended by his servant Peascod, is cuckolded by his young wife Asspida and her equally young lover Validore.
This Shakespearean comedy particularly dwells on the liminal youth of its protagonist, "Not yet old enough for a man, nor young enough for a boy; as a squash is before 'tis a peascod, or a codling when 'tis almost an apple: 'tis with him in standing water, between boy and man" (1.
Head to the main Peascod Street for high street names or Windsor Royal Station for designer brands.
On the other side of the castle walls, Windsor's main shopping drags - Peascod Street and the High Street - contain the usual retail temptations, but with more exclusive designer label shops that in the off-season provide a perfect Christmas gift hunting ground.
Anti-pastoralists like O'Nolan and Kavanagh were, of course, following a lead which had been given by James Joyce, whose own views on the peasantry became even clearer with the publication in the 1940s of Stephen Hero, in which the main protagonist says: "The glorified peasantry seem all to me as like one another as a peascod is to another peascod.