peccadillo

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pec·ca·dil·lo

 (pĕk′ə-dĭl′ō)
n. pl. pec·ca·dil·loes or pec·ca·dil·los
A small sin or fault.

[Spanish pecadillo, diminutive of pecado, sin, and Italian peccadiglio, diminutive of peccato, sin, both from Latin peccātum, from neuter of peccātus, past participle of peccāre, to sin; see ped- in Indo-European roots.]

peccadillo

(ˌpɛkəˈdɪləʊ)
n, pl -loes or -los
a petty sin or trifling fault
[C16: from Spanish pecadillo, from pecado sin, from Latin peccātum, from peccāre to transgress]

pec•ca•dil•lo

(ˌpɛk əˈdɪl oʊ)

n., pl. -loes, -los.
a minor or slight sin or offense; trifling fault.
[1585–95; < Sp pecadillo, diminutive of pecado sin < Latin peccātum transgression, n. use of neuter past participle of peccāre to sin.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.peccadillo - a petty misdeed
misbehavior, misbehaviour, misdeed - improper or wicked or immoral behavior

peccadillo

noun misdeed, slip, error, lapse, indiscretion, misdemeanour, infraction, petty sin, trifling fault extra-marital peccadilloes by public figures
Translations

peccadillo

[ˌpekəˈdɪləʊ] N (peccadillos or peccadilloes (pl)) → pecadillo m, falta f leve

peccadillo

n pl <-(e)s> → kleine Sünde; (of youth)Jugendsünde f

peccadillo

[ˌpɛkəˈdɪləʊ] npeccatuccio
References in classic literature ?
And on the strength of peccadillos, reprehensible in an author, but excusable in a son, the Anglo-Saxon race is accused of prudishness, humbug, pretentiousness, deceit, cunning, and bad cooking.
We Brits, mocked in France for our lack of interest in sex and our censorious approach to peccadillos which most other nationalities would applaud in a man, have been surprised by French press reaction.
It could also be argued their various peccadillos, and faux pas, have added some spice to their stories which has generated what might be called a prurient interest among visitors.
Members of both like to highlight the socalled plight of the rich and famous, whose personal peccadillos are sometimes raucously exposed by the press.
Liverpool has so much to be proud of and such a rich cultural heritage to celebrate, that critics with their myopic views, who linger in the shadows waiting to snipe at any of our peccadillos, (and there are many), should be exposed for their injudiciousness.
His private peccadillos are a far cry from the clean-cut, wholesome image he lets the public believe.
The real point of Doyle's essay, it appears, is to take the reader to task for dwelling too long on the peccadillos of Holy Mother Church, demanding perfection while condemning the church for its own humanity.