pedant


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ped·ant

 (pĕd′nt)
n.
1. One who ostentatiously exhibits academic knowledge or who pays undue attention to minor details or formal rules.
2. Obsolete A schoolmaster.

[French pédant or Italian pedante (French, from Italian), possibly from Vulgar Latin *paedēns, *paedent-, present participle of *paedere, to instruct, probably from Greek paideuein, from pais, paid-, child; see pedo-2.]

pedant

(ˈpɛdənt)
n
1. a person who relies too much on academic learning or who is concerned chiefly with insignificant detail
2. (Education) archaic a schoolmaster or teacher
[C16: via Old French from Italian pedante teacher; perhaps related to Latin paedagōgus pedagogue]

ped•ant

(ˈpɛd nt)

n.
1. a person who makes an excessive or inappropriate display of learning.
2. a person who overemphasizes rules or details, esp. in teaching.
3. a person who adheres rigidly to book knowledge without regard to common sense.
4. Obs. a schoolmaster.
[1580–90; < Italian pedante teacher, pedant; appar. akin to pedagogue]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pedant - a person who pays more attention to formal rules and book learning than they meritpedant - a person who pays more attention to formal rules and book learning than they merit
purist - someone who insists on great precision and correctness (especially in the use of words)
bookman, scholar, scholarly person, student - a learned person (especially in the humanities); someone who by long study has gained mastery in one or more disciplines

pedant

noun
1. hairsplitter, quibbler, doctrinaire, literalist, sophist, nit-picker (informal), dogmatist, casuist, pettifogger We thought him a pedant and a bore.
2. scholar, academic, intellectual, scholastic, bookworm, egghead (informal), pedagogue a cloistered pedant deeply immersed in the past
Translations
مُدَّعي العِلْم، مُتباهي في معرفَتِه
pedantpuntičkářškolomet
ordkløverpedantpernittengryn
pedanttisaivartelijaviisastelija
fontoskodó embertudálékos ember
maîur uppfullur af lærdómshrokasmámunasamur maîur
didžiuoklispedantaspedantiškaipedantiškaspedantiškumas
lielībniekspedants
pedant
bilgiçkuralcı kimseukalâ

pedant

[ˈpedənt] Npedante mf

pedant

[ˈpɛdənt] n
to be a pedant → être tatillon(ne)

pedant

nPedant(in) m(f), → Kleinigkeitskrämer(in) m(f)

pedant

[ˈpɛdənt] npedante m/f

pedant

(ˈpedənt) noun
1. a person who makes a great show of his knowledge.
2. a person who attaches too much importance to minor details.
peˈdantic (-ˈdӕn-) adjective
peˈdantically adverb
ˈpedantry noun
References in classic literature ?
O, I know he's a good fellow--you needn't frown--an excellent fellow, and I always mean to see more of him; but a hide-bound pedant for all that; an ignorant, blatant pedant.
He was a pedant, to the most extreme point, the greatest pedant I had met on earth, and with that had a vanity only befitting Alexander of Macedon.
I speak of that spiteful and intriguing Italian -- of the pedant who has tried to put on his own head a crown which he stole from under a pillow -- of the scoundrel who calls his party the party of the king -- who wants to send the princes of the blood to prison, not daring to kill them, as our great cardinal -- our cardinal did -- of the miser, who weighs his gold pieces and keeps the clipped ones for fear, though he is rich, of losing them at play next morning -- of the impudent fellow who insults the queen, as they say -- so much the worse for her -- and who is going in three months to make war upon us, in order that he may retain his pensions; is that the master whom you propose to me?
I wish the dragon had him," muttered King Aetes to himself, "and the four-footed pedant, his schoolmaster, into the bargain.
As to the clerks, he pronounced them mere pretenders, not one of whom had ever been among the Indians, nor farther to the northwest than Montreal, nor of higher rank than barkeeper of a tavern or marker of a billiard-table, excepting one, who had been a school-master, and whom he emphatically sets down for "as foolish a pedant as ever lived.
This is that Lavalle whom the world, immersed in speculations of immediate gain, did not know nor suspect--the Lavalle whom they adjudged to the last a pedant and a theorist.
His tones were no longer those of the erudite pedant theorizing upon the abstract and the unknowable; but those of the man of action-- determined, but tinged also by a note of indescribable hopelessness and grief which wrung an answering pang from Clayton's heart.
But Ridley was now off on grievances of his own connected with the washing of his shirts, which somehow led to the frequent visits of Hughling Elliot, who was a bore, a pedant, a dry stick of a man, and yet Ridley couldn't simply point at the door and tell him to go.
But the idea of this dried-up pedant, this elaborator of small explanations about as important as the surplus stock of false antiquities kept in a vendor's back chamber, having first got this adorable young creature to marry him, and then passing his honeymoon away from her, groping after his mouldy futilities (Will was given to hyperbole)-- this sudden picture stirred him with a sort of comic disgust: he was divided between the impulse to laugh aloud and the equally unseasonable impulse to burst into scornful invective.
Her successor and distant cousin, James of Scotland (James I of England), was a bigoted pedant, and under his rule the perennial Court corruption, striking in, became foul and noisome.
Upborne and surrounded as we are by this all-creating nature, soft and fluid as a cloud or the air, why should we be such hard pedants, and magnify a few forms?
So necessary is this to the understanding the characters of men, that none are more ignorant of them than those learned pedants whose lives have been entirely consumed in colleges, and among books; for however exquisitely human nature may have been described by writers, the true practical system can be learnt only in the world.