pedanticism


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Related to pedanticism: abysmal

pedanticism

(pɪˈdæntɪsɪzəm)
n
pedantry; an instance of being pedantic

pedanticism

1. the character or practices of a pedant, as excessive display of learning.
2. a slavish attention to rules, details, etc; pedantry. — pedant, n. — pedantic, adj.
See also: Learning
References in periodicals archive ?
I have nothing against a touch of pedanticism, and perhaps in the past could even have been something of a pedagogue myself, but should deconstruction be taken too far the intended meaning of the text may be lost.
But most of all because it would save the film from flat, boring, caricaturish pedanticism.
Mary Austin, whose fiction, poetry, journalism, and drama drew largely on her experiences in the developing American West of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, left readers with a vast body of work rife with ecological insight, irony, artistry, pedanticism, and paradox.
Certainly, the term "public interest" is a relatively empty phrase when one approaches it from the pedanticism of the academic world.
Gradually Hughes developed reservations about what he perceived as the increasing pedanticism in Tolson's verse.
It may appear an exaggerated pedanticism to invoke again, at this point, Bakhtin and his theory of the modem novel, but his vision of the genre as a polyphonic decalage from the monologism of the European eighteenth-century utopia exactly fits the phenomenon we are addressing.
On this view, Biedermeier is less a decadent form of Romanticism than it is a revival of Enlightenment outlooks under the changed social and cultural circumstances of the early nineteenth century, and Kind's versatility, rationalism, pedanticism, and moralizing proclivities point back to the eighteenth century, as does also the strongly social nature of much of his activity.