peddler


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ped·dler

 (pĕd′lər)
n.
One who travels about selling wares for a living.

[Middle English pedlere, probably alteration of peddere, perhaps from Medieval Latin pedārius, one who goes on foot (such as a pilgrim), from Latin pēs, ped-, foot; see pedi-.]

peddler

(ˈpɛdlə)
n
1. (Recreational Drugs) a person who sells illegal drugs, esp narcotics
2. (Commerce) the usual US spelling of pedlar

ped•dler

(ˈpɛd lər)

n.
1. a person who sells from door to door or in the street.
2. a person who tries to promote some cause, candidate, viewpoint, etc.
Sometimes, pedlar, pedler.
[1350–1400; Middle English pedlere, unexplained alter. of peder, derivative of ped(de) basket]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.peddler - someone who travels about selling his wares (as on the streets or at carnivals)peddler - someone who travels about selling his wares (as on the streets or at carnivals)
chapman - archaic term for an itinerant peddler
cheapjack - a peddler of inferior goods
crier - a peddler who shouts to advertise the goods he sells
muffin man - formerly an itinerant peddler of muffins
sandboy - a young peddler of sand; used now only to express great happiness in `happy as a sandboy'
marketer, seller, trafficker, vender, vendor - someone who promotes or exchanges goods or services for money
transmigrante - a Latin American who buys used goods in the United States and takes them to Latin America to sell
2.peddler - an unlicensed dealer in illegal drugs
criminal, crook, felon, malefactor, outlaw - someone who has committed a crime or has been legally convicted of a crime
dealer - a seller of illicit goods; "a dealer in stolen goods"

peddler

pedlar
noun seller, vendor, hawker, duffer (dialect), huckster, door-to-door salesman, cheap-jack (informal), colporteur drug peddlers LA's ban on sidewalk peddlers

peddler

noun
A person who sells narcotics illegally:
Slang: pusher.
Translations

peddler

[ˈpɛdlər] n
(= door-to-door salesman) → colporteur m
[rumours, information] → colporteur/euse m/f
References in classic literature ?
An old man named Daniel Baker, living near Lebanon, Iowa, was suspected by his neighbors of having murdered a peddler who had obtained permission to pass the night at his house.
The peddler with his pack traversed the country by all manner of lonely roads, and was compelled to rely upon the country people for hospitality.
A PEDDLER drove his Ass to the seashore to buy salt.
In front of the door three merry fellows, a tinker, a peddler, and a beggar, were seated on a bench in the sun quaffing stout ale.
The peddler said it was warranted to dye any hair a beautiful raven black and wouldn't wash off.
They knew when I had my teeth out and a new set made; they knew when I put on a false front- piece; they knew when the fruit peddler asked me to be his third wife--I never told 'em, an' you can be sure HE never did, but they don't NEED to be told in this village; they have nothin' to do but guess, an' they'll guess right every time.
The Torzhok peddler woman, in a whining voice, went on offering her wares, especially a pair of goatskin slippers.
He scoffed at them as adventures, mountebanks, sideshow riffraff, dime museum freaks; he assailed their showy titles with measureless derision; he said they were back-alley barbers disguised as nobilities, peanut peddlers masquerading as gentlemen, organ-grinders bereft of their brother monkey.
These were called coureurs des bois, rangers of the woods; originally men who had accompanied the Indians in their hunting expeditions, and made themselves acquainted with remote tracts and tribes; and who now became, as it were, peddlers of the wilderness.
Crowding the narrow streets in front of them are beggars, who beg forever, yet never collect any thing; and wonderful cripples, distorted out of all semblance of humanity, almost; vagabonds driving laden asses; porters carrying dry-goods boxes as large as cottages on their backs; peddlers of grapes, hot corn, pumpkin seeds, and a hundred other things, yelling like fiends; and sleeping happily, comfortably, serenely, among the hurrying feet, are the famed dogs of Constantinople; drifting noiselessly about are squads of Turkish women, draped from chin to feet in flowing robes, and with snowy veils bound about their heads, that disclose only the eyes and a vague, shadowy notion of their features.
What, perhaps, with other things, made Stubb such an easygoing, unfearing man, so cheerily trudging off with the burden of life in a world full of grave peddlers, all bowed to the ground with their packs; what helped to bring about that almost impious good-humor of his; that thing must have been his pipe.
And the winds of adventure blew the oyster pirate sloops up and down San Francisco Bay, from raided oyster-beds and fights at night on shoal and flat, to markets in the morning against city wharves, where peddlers and saloon-keepers came down to buy.