pedlar


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ped·lar

 (pĕd′lər)
n. Chiefly British
Variant of peddler.

pedlar

;

peddler

or

pedler

n
(Commerce) a person who peddles; hawker
[C14: changed from peder, from ped, pedde basket, of obscure origin]

ped•dler

(ˈpɛd lər)

n.
1. a person who sells from door to door or in the street.
2. a person who tries to promote some cause, candidate, viewpoint, etc.
Sometimes, pedlar, pedler.
[1350–1400; Middle English pedlere, unexplained alter. of peder, derivative of ped(de) basket]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pedlar - someone who travels about selling his wares (as on the streets or at carnivals)pedlar - someone who travels about selling his wares (as on the streets or at carnivals)
chapman - archaic term for an itinerant peddler
cheapjack - a peddler of inferior goods
crier - a peddler who shouts to advertise the goods he sells
muffin man - formerly an itinerant peddler of muffins
sandboy - a young peddler of sand; used now only to express great happiness in `happy as a sandboy'
marketer, seller, trafficker, vender, vendor - someone who promotes or exchanges goods or services for money
transmigrante - a Latin American who buys used goods in the United States and takes them to Latin America to sell

pedlar

see peddler
Translations
بائِع مُتَجَوِّل
podomnípouliční obchodník
dørsælger
farandsali
işportacıseyyar satıcı

pedlar

[ˈpedləʳ] Nvendedor(a) m/f ambulante, buhonero (o.f.) m

pedlar

nHausierer(in) m(f); (of drugs)Dealer(in) m(f) (inf)

pedlar

[ˈpɛdləʳ] nvenditore/trice ambulante; (of drugs) → spacciatore/trice

peddle

(ˈpedl) verb
to go from place to place or house to house selling (small objects). Gypsies often peddle (goods) from door to door.
ˈpedlar , (also, especially American) ˈpeddler noun
a person who peddles. I bought it from a pedlar.
References in classic literature ?
Carpenter, when he's through with that buckle, tell him to forge a pair of steel shoulder-blades; there's a pedlar aboard with a crushing pack.
In that far-off time superstition clung easily round every person or thing that was at all unwonted, or even intermittent and occasional merely, like the visits of the pedlar or the knife-grinder.
I suppose I could have passed for a pedlar, but undoubtedly it would have been very embarrassing.
A young fellow, a tobacco pedlar by trade, was on his way from Morristown, where he had dealt largely with the Deacon of the Shaker settlement, to the village of Parker's Falls, on Salmon River.
I have listened for hours to this most pertinacious pedlar (I wonder whether he is dead or has made a fortune), while sitting on the rail of the old Duke of S- (she's dead, poor thing
And she could not bear to think that anyone lived who was more beautiful than she was; so she dressed herself up as an old pedlar, and went her way over the hills, to the place where the dwarfs dwelt.
Twenty-five francs," smiled the pedlar obsequiously.
It cannot be right to be the slave of one's household gods, and I protest that if my furniture ever annoyed me by wanting to be dusted when I wanted to be doing something else, and there was no one to do the dusting for me, I would cast it all into the nearest bonfire and sit and warm my toes at the flames with great contentment, triumphantly selling my dusters to the very next pedlar who was weak enough to buy them.
Finally, during a quarrel with some woman (to whom he was making up), in which most of the inmates of the house took part apparently, he was openly abused by his chief enemy, an athletic pedlar, for an informer, and for having driven '' our young gentleman to Siberia, the same as you did those young fellows who broke into houses.
This was an antic fellow, half pedlar and half mountebank, who travelled about the country on foot to vend hones, stops, razors, washballs, harness-paste, medicine for dogs and horses, cheap perfumery, cosmetics, and such-like wares, which he carried in a case slung to his back.
The same afternoon brought a grey-headed, seedy visitor, looking like a Jew pedlar, who appeared to me to be much excited, and who was closely followed by a slip-shod elderly woman.
Lizaveta, the pedlar, sold me some collars and cuffs cheap, pretty, new, embroidered ones.