peeler


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peel·er 1

 (pē′lər)
n.
1. One that peels, especially a kitchen implement for peeling the rinds or skins from fruits or vegetables.
2. One that can be readily peeled, especially a crab that is about to molt.

peel·er 2

 (pē′lər)
n. Chiefly British
A police officer.

[After Sir Robert Peel.]

peeler

(ˈpiːlə)
n
1. (Cookery) a special knife or mechanical device for peeling vegetables, fruit, etc: a potato peeler.
2. slang US a striptease dancer

peeler

(ˈpiːlə)
n
(Law) old-fashioned slang Brit another word for policeman
[C19: from the founder of the police force, Sir Robert Peel]

peel•er1

(ˈpi lər)

n.
1. a kitchen implement for removing the peel from a vegetable or fruit.
2. one that peels.
[1325–75]

peel•er2

(ˈpi lər)

n. Brit. Archaic.
a police officer.
[1810–20; after Sir R. Peel; see -er1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.peeler - a performer who provides erotic entertainment by undressing to musicpeeler - a performer who provides erotic entertainment by undressing to music
performer, performing artist - an entertainer who performs a dramatic or musical work for an audience
2.peeler - a worker who peels the skins from fruits and vegetables
worker - a person who works at a specific occupation; "he is a good worker"
3.peeler - a device for peeling vegetables or fruits; "she invented a potato peeler"
device - an instrumentality invented for a particular purpose; "the device is small enough to wear on your wrist"; "a device intended to conserve water"

peeler

noun
Chiefly British. A member of a law-enforcement agency:
Informal: cop, law.
Slang: bull, copper, flatfoot, fuzz, gendarme, heat, man (often uppercase).
Chiefly British: bobby, constable.
Translations
مِقْشَرَه
loupačškrabka
skræller
hámozókés
flysjari, skrælari
škrabák
soyucu

peeler

[ˈpiːləʳ] N
1. (also potato peeler) → pelapatatas m inv
2. (Brit) (archaic) (= policeman) → polizonte m

peeler

[ˈpiːlər] n (for potatoes)éplucheur m

peeler

1
n (old Brit inf) → Gendarm m (old)

peeler

2
n
(= potato peeler)Schälmesser nt, → Schäler m
(dated US sl: = stripper) → Stripper(in) m(f) (inf)

peeler

[ˈpiːləʳ] n (potato knife) → pelapatate m inv

peel

(piːl) verb
1. to take off the skin or outer covering of (a fruit or vegetable). She peeled the potatoes.
2. to take off or come off in small pieces. The paint is beginning to peel (off).
noun
the skin of certain fruits, especially oranges, lemons etc.
ˈpeeler noun
a tool etc that peels (something). a potato-peeler.
ˈpeelings noun plural
the strips or pieces of skin peeled off an apple, potato etc. potato peelings.
References in classic literature ?
It’s a peeler without, I can tell you, good woman; but what cares I?
Hannah Armin, Keely Noel, Abby Peeler and Peyton Giffney made clutch shot after clutch shot in the second half, and Kaneland rallied from 12 points down for an improbable 53-50 victory.
Peeler has more than 17 years of litigation experience and currently resides in Albany, Ga.
Some people are really good at what they do, but they struggle with business relationships," said Marie Peeler, founder and principal of Peeler Associates, an executive coaching and leadership development firm in Pembroke, MA.
Elmira's large senior class provided the perfect time for Justin Peeler to take over as head football coach.
A BOY of 11 was suspended from a Tyneside primary for taking a potato peeler into school.
Pratt, Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts, received the first patent for a cast iron apple peeler with a paring arm that returned to its starting point.
The Kyocera 3-Inch Paring Knife with Vertical Double Edge Peeler is designed with advanced ceramic ultra sharp blades that stay sharp 10 times longer than metal blades, say officials from the Costa Mesa, Calif.
Two examples of such products are the Rapid Skillet and the Rapid Peeler.
Peeler argues that the familial imagery in the Epistle to the Hebrews shapes the author's presentation of the three primary persons of the sermon: God; Jesus; and the humans in relationship with them, the author, and his audience.
Vulnerable Valerie Peeler, 66, was left devastated when Patricia Brown targeted her by pretending to be her friend after her husband died.
Author Peeler, an award-winning baseball poet, nostalgically chronicles the long-running annual competition between North Carolina State University and Wake Forest University, a sporting and social event that drew large crowds of male and female college students from surrounding states.