peer review


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peer review

n
1. (Education) the evaluation by fellow specialists of research that someone has done in order to assess its suitability for publication or further development
2. (Journalism & Publishing) the evaluation by fellow specialists of research that someone has done in order to assess its suitability for publication or further development
ˌpeer-reˈviewed adj
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.peer review - evaluate professionally a colleague's work
critique, review - appraise critically; "She reviews books for the New York Times"; "Please critique this performance"
References in periodicals archive ?
It includes a collection of reflections on the history of peer review, current issues such as sustainability and ethics, while also casting a look into the future including advances such as preprint servers and AI applications.
There are three types of peer review reports: pass, pass with deficiency or fail.
Additionally, the entire peer-review process has been attacked in recent years because of several articles, replete with bad science, that managed to get through peer review and were published in reputable journals.
Can peer review enhance writing rather than just focus on superficial errors?
The study analyzed the results of a radiation oncology-specific, peer review survey conducted by ASTRO in 2013.
In the course of research, we have also reevaluated and reaffirmed our policy of double-blind peer review for reasons to be detailed herein.
Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.
The process of peer review is generally considered essential to academic quality and is widely viewed as fair and equitable.
put it that the process of peer review serves an important role in scientific publication (the core assumptions inherent in the process of peer review must be evaluated and adapted to the changing environment): well-organized forms of free information exchange may provide useful models for scientific publication, an open review process makes research available immediately and allows multiple people to comment upon a manuscript, whereas how often an article is cited may be a reasonable proxy for the impact of the paper on the scientific community.
And, if they are falsely accused, they often mistakenly believe that the truth and the facts will exonerate them if they are subjected to peer review.
Recently, we have peer reviewed each other in the administration of the in-class peer review workshops we organize at our respective colleges, and we have come to this conclusion: despite stylistic and institutional differences, writing workshops address both the practical and philosophical challenges of peer review when they draw students, tutors, faculty, and writing center directors into an authentic conversation about what peer review is and how it works.
In the healthcare industry, peer review is the process by which groups or committees of physicians review their colleagues' work.