peirastic

peirastic

(paɪˈræstɪk)
adj
(Philosophy) involving an experiment; experimental
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References in periodicals archive ?
As it disabuses those who pretend to know, the play becomes an example of peirastic rhetoric.
In transforming comic potential into tragedy, Dream operated as a peirastic argument to offer counsel on domestic policy.
Aristotle divided dialectic discussion into four forms, called didascalic, dialectic, peirastic, and sophistic.
Peirastic dialectic is very common in the Socratic dialogues of Plato, and it is here that Aristotle places Socratic questioning.
The difference from peirastic dialectic lies in the fact that in gymnastic the respondent need not choose a thesis he believes in and he also need not answer in accordance with his own beliefs, so long as his answers are not too outrageous, a transparent attempt to thwart the questioner's purpose.
In peirastic, the form of conversation we see in most of the Socratic dialogues, the questioner is quite uncommitted to the truth of the argument, although the respondent must answer according to his own beliefs, the aim of the process being to show that the respondent does not know what he should know if he were an expert in the field he claims.