penillion


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penillion

(pɪˈnɪlɪən) or

pennillion

pl n, sing penill (pɪˈnɪl)
(Music, other) the Welsh art or practice of singing poetry in counterpoint to a traditional melody played on the harp
[from Welsh: verses, plural of penill verse, stanza]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Hwn ydi'r 250ed Lln y Llysiau i mi ei sgwennu - ac mae'r diolch i gyd i chi'r darllenwyr am yrru lluniau, atgofion, arferion, penillion, straeon, ebost a llythyrau diddorol atom.
In winning this status we hope to not only protect the environment and enhance the biodiversity and dark skies of the area, but go a step further than other designations in the world by raising awareness of the features that link the stars of our culture, from the Mabinogi to the old penillion.
Dilynir hyn yn yr ail adran gan ei gerddi plant, ac mae'r gyfrol Penillion y Plant (1990) yma yn ei chrynswth, gydag ychwanegiad o bedair cerdd arall.
Penillion is the Welsh art of singing poetry with which instrument?
Ond doedden nhw ddim, a doedden ni ond yn cofio'r cytgan, felly mi es innau ati i gyfieithu'r penillion.
At school, I took part in St David's Day celebrations for our national patron saint, wearing a traditional woollen shawl and tall black hat, I sang songs in the old language and recited penillion verse at Eisteddfodau.
Caniadau'r Diwygiad: golwg ar emynau, penillion a thonau Diwygiad 1904-05.
Like Vallas after him, Scholes was apparently puzzled by the "true successor to Beethoven" trafficking with the conductor of the Gaiety Theatre, belting out hymns with out-of-tune parishioners at the Temple Church, presiding over choral singing, penillion, triple harp, and folk dancing competitions in Aberystwyth, or filling in for wedding-and-funeral duty (at six shillings per service) at a South London church.
The most notable characteristic of this version is the tendency of the seven-syllable lines of the original to be extended into the octosyllables, generally with a strong trochaic rhythm, familiar from the penillion telyn and certainly already popular no later than the first half of the seventeenth century, as shown by Rhys Prichard's choice of them for the quatrains of Cannwyll y Gimpy.
Ceri then reverted back to the harp to play, and sing some Cerdd Dant or penillion in the South Wales tradition.
Ceir penillion yn annog merched i "Fwydo o'r fron: "Fe wnaeth Duw dy fronne i fagu/Fel y gwnaeth e'r groth i blannu/ Nid gwell y fron na rotho sugyn/ Na chroth yr hesb na ddygodd blentyn.
Another highlight was the penillion singing of Arfon Gwilym.