penitentiary

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pen·i·ten·tia·ry

 (pĕn′ĭ-tĕn′shə-rē)
n. pl. pen·i·ten·tia·ries
1. A prison for those convicted of major crimes.
2. Roman Catholic Church
a. A tribunal of the Roman Curia having jurisdiction in matters relating to penance, dispensations, and papal absolutions.
b. A priest whose special function is the administration of the sacrament of penance in a particular church or diocese.
adj.
1. Of or for the purpose of penance; penitential.
2. Relating to or used for punishment or reform of criminals or wrongdoers.
3. Resulting in or punishable by imprisonment in a penitentiary: a penitentiary offense.

[Middle English penitenciarie, penance officer, episcopal prison, from Medieval Latin pēnitentiāria, feminine of pēnitentiārius, from Latin paenitentia, penitence, from paenitēns, penitent; see penitent.]

penitentiary

(ˌpɛnɪˈtɛnʃərɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Law) (in the US and Canada) a state or federal prison: in Canada, esp a federal prison for offenders convicted of serious crimes. Sometimes shortened to: pen
2. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church
a. a cleric appointed to supervise the administration of the sacrament of penance in a particular area
b. a priest who has special faculties to absolve particularly grave sins
c. a cardinal who presides over a tribunal that decides all matters affecting the sacrament of penance
d. this tribunal itself
adj
3. another word for penitential1
4. (Law) US and Canadian (of an offence) punishable by imprisonment in a penitentiary
[C15 (meaning also: an officer dealing with penances): from Medieval Latin poenitēntiārius, from Latin paenitēns penitent]

pen•i•ten•tia•ry

(ˌpɛn ɪˈtɛn ʃə ri)

n., pl. -ries,
adj. n.
1. a place for imprisonment, reformatory discipline, or punishment, esp., in the U.S., a state or federal institution for serious offenders.
2. a tribunal in the Curia Romana, presided over by a cardinal having jurisdiction over certain matters, as penance, confession, or dispensation.
adj.
3. (of an offense) punishable by imprisonment in a penitentiary.
4. of, pertaining to, or intended for imprisonment, reformatory discipline, or punishment.
[1375–1425; late Middle English penitenciarie priest who administers penance, prison < Medieval Latin pēnitentiārius of penance. See penitence, -ary]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.penitentiary - a correctional institution for those convicted of major crimespenitentiary - a correctional institution for those convicted of major crimes
correctional institution - a penal institution maintained by the government
Adj.1.penitentiary - used for punishment or reform of criminals or wrongdoers; "penitentiary institutions"
punitive, punitory - inflicting punishment; "punitive justice"; "punitive damages"
2.penitentiary - showing or constituting penance; "penitential tears"; "wrote a penitential letter apologizing for her hasty words"
penitent, repentant - feeling or expressing remorse for misdeeds

penitentiary

noun
A place for the confinement of persons in lawful detention:
Informal: lockup, pen.
Chiefly Regional: calaboose.
Translations
fengselkasjott

penitentiary

[ˌpenɪˈtenʃərɪ] N (esp US) (= prison) → penitenciaria f

penitentiary

[ˌpɛnɪˈtɛnʃəri] n (US)prison f

penitentiary

n (esp US: = prison) → Strafanstalt f, → Gefängnis nt

penitentiary

[ˌpɛnɪˈtɛnʃərɪ] n (esp Am) (prison) → penitenziario, carcere m
References in periodicals archive ?
An OSCE-supported two-day training course on the protection of human rights in penitentiaries concluded today in Aghveran, Kotayk region, Armenia.
Here, the author (associate professor of literature and an affiliated faculty member of Ethnic Studies at the University of California, San Diego) argues that the incarceration of Black people and other historically repressed groups in chain gangs, peon camps, prison plantations, and penitentiaries represents a ghostly perpetuation of chattel slavery.
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Aibek Turganbaev, Head of the Kyrgyz Prison Administration, added: "This training course formed an important element of efforts aimed at improving security in penitentiaries.
In the absence of any Protestant conceptions of Purgatory, Throness argues that penitentiaries were intended to enforce redemptive practices through labour as much as prayer and sorrowful reflection (p.
Moylan, the Inspector of Penitentiaries, who had members of the Catholic hierarchy in English Canada lobbying for him.
Mexico's powerful drug cartels have taken their violent confrontations to the country's federal penitentiaries, resulting in the deaths of three prominent drug traffickers in the past year.
As of January 2003, the Romanian General Department of Penitentiaries, under the Ministry of Justice, included 43 facilities (see Table 1).
Others have mocked the notion of candidates soliciting votes in federal penitentiaries.
Ultimately, these policy directives flow from the Department of Justice through the Federal Bureau of Prisons to penitentiaries throughout the U.
John Frankenheimer's fictionalized account of double murderer Robert Stroud's jailhouse transformation offers a long meditative look at the very sort of rehabilitation penitentiaries are supposed to effect, but hardly ever do.
As in nearly all other states, during the nineteenth century female prisoners in Illinois were incarcerated alongside men within the state's three male penitentiaries at Alton (1835-1858), Joliet (18591896), and Chester (1878-1889).