pensive


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pen·sive

 (pĕn′sĭv)
adj.
1. Engaged in deep and serious thought.
2. Showing or expressing deep, often melancholy thought: a pensive look.

[Middle English pensif, from Old French, from penser, to think, from Latin pēnsāre, frequentative of pendere, to weigh; see (s)pen- in Indo-European roots.]

pen′sive·ly adv.
pen′sive·ness n.
Synonyms: pensive, contemplative, reflective, meditative, thoughtful
These adjectives mean characterized by or disposed to deep or serious thought. Pensive often connotes a wistful, dreamy, or sad quality: "while pensive poets painful vigils keep" (Alexander Pope).
Contemplative implies slow directed consideration, often with conscious intent of achieving better understanding or spiritual or aesthetic enrichment: "[He] had envisioned an actual grove of academe through which scholars young and old might take contemplative strolls" (Tom Wolfe).
Reflective suggests careful analytical deliberation, as in reappraising past experience: "She ... is as wise as if she'd been on this earth for eighty years. Her nature is reflective—not all over the map, like mine" (Alice Munro).
Meditative implies earnest sustained thought: "She sat with her shoulders rounded in some clearly deepening meditative privacy and forgot me" (E.L. Doctorow).
Thoughtful can refer to absorption in thought or to the habit of reflection and circumspection: "I had spoken at once ... to Silvius about our departure, and we talked the matter over, for he was a thoughtful and intelligent child, and children have a wisdom of their own" (Ursula K. Le Guin).

pensive

(ˈpɛnsɪv)
adj
1. deeply or seriously thoughtful, often with a tinge of sadness
2. expressing or suggesting pensiveness
[C14: from Old French pensif, from penser to think, from Latin pensāre to consider; compare pension1]
ˈpensively adv
ˈpensiveness n

pen•sive

(ˈpɛn sɪv)

adj.
1. dreamily or wistfully thoughtful.
2. expressing thoughtfulness or sadness.
[1325–75; Middle English pensif < Middle French, derivative of penser to think < Latin pēnsāre to weigh, consider, derivative of pendere. See pension, -ive]
pen′sive•ly, adv.
pen′sive•ness, n.
syn: pensive, meditative, reflective suggest quiet modes of apparent or real thought. pensive suggests dreaminess or wistfulness, and may involve little or no thought to any purpose: a pensive, faraway look. meditative involves thinking of certain facts or phenomena, perhaps in the religious sense of “contemplation,” without necessarily having a goal of complete understanding or of action: a slow, meditative reply. reflective has a strong implication of orderly, perhaps analytic, processes of thought, usu. with a definite goal of understanding: a reflective critic.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.pensive - deeply or seriously thoughtful; "Byron lives on not only in his poetry, but also in his creation of the 'Byronic hero' - the persona of a brooding melancholy young man";
thoughtful - exhibiting or characterized by careful thought; "a thoughtful paper"
2.pensive - showing pensive sadness; "the sensitive and wistful response of a poet to the gentler phases of beauty"
sad - experiencing or showing sorrow or unhappiness; "feeling sad because his dog had died"; "Better by far that you should forget and smile / Than that you should remember and be sad"- Christina Rossetti

pensive

adjective thoughtful, serious, sad, blue (informal), grave, sober, musing, preoccupied, melancholy, solemn, reflective, dreamy, wistful, mournful, contemplative, meditative, sorrowful, ruminative, in a brown study (informal), cogitative He looked suddenly sombre and pensive.
happy, active, cheerful, frivolous, joyous, carefree, gay, light-hearted

pensive

adjective
Of, characterized by, or disposed to thought:
Idiom: in a brown study.
Translations
مُسْتَغْرِق في أفكارِه
zádumčivý
eftertænksomtankefuld
zamišljen
í òungum òönkum
liūdnai susimąstęsliūdnas svajingumaspaskendęs savo mintyse
domīgs
zádumčivý

pensive

[ˈpensɪv] ADJ (gen) → pensativo, meditabundo

pensive

[ˈpɛnsɪv] adj [person, look] → pensif/ive

pensive

adj, pensively
advnachdenklich; (= sadly serious)schwermütig

pensive

[ˈpɛnsɪv] adjpensoso/a

pensive

(ˈpensiv) adjective
thinking deeply (about something). a pensive mood.
ˈpensively adverb
ˈpensiveness noun
References in classic literature ?
Amy chirped like a cricket, and Jo wandered through the airs at her own sweet will, always coming out at the wrong place with a croak or a quaver that spoiled the most pensive tune.
The scout was hard by, leaning in a pensive posture on his own fatal and avenging weapon; while Tamenund, supported by the elders of his nation, occupied a high place at hand, whence he might look down on the mute and sorrowful assemblage of his people.
We behold aged men and grandames, a clergyman with the Puritanic stiffness still in his garb and mien, and a red-coated officer of the old French war; and there comes the shop-keeping Pyncheon of a century ago, with the ruffles turned back from his wrists; and there the periwigged and brocaded gentleman of the artist's legend, with the beautiful and pensive Alice, who brings no pride out of her virgin grave.
On a fine autumnal afternoon, Ichabod, in pensive mood, sat enthroned on the lofty stool from whence he usually watched all the concerns of his little literary realm.
He was too clever for a bad governess, for a parson's daughter, to spoil; and the strangest if not the brightest thread in the pensive embroidery I just spoke of was the impression I might have got, if I had dared to work it out, that he was under some influence operating in his small intellectual life as a tremendous incitement.
The firmaments of air and sea were hardly separable in that all-pervading azure; only, the pensive air was transparently pure and soft, with a woman's look, and the robust and man-like sea heaved with long, strong, lingering swells, as Samson's chest in his sleep.
The pensive, reflective tone in which this was spoken appeared to amuse Andy prodigiously, and he drew a little behind, and shook so as apparently to run a great risk of failing off his horse, while Sam's face was immovably composed into the most doleful gravity.
There have always been ruins, no doubt; and there have always been pensive people to sigh over them, and asses to scratch upon them their names and the important date of their visit.
One was a woman in a slim black dress, belted small under the armpits, with bulges like a cabbage in the middle of the sleeves, and a large black scoop-shovel bonnet with a black veil, and white slim ankles crossed about with black tape, and very wee black slippers, like a chisel, and she was leaning pensive on a tombstone on her right elbow, under a weeping willow, and her other hand hanging down her side holding a white handkerchief and a reticule, and underneath the picture it said "Shall I Never See Thee More Alas.
A pensive silence followed, which lasted some moments, then Wilson said:
Emma's pensive meditations, as she walked home, were not interrupted; but on entering the parlour, she found those who must rouse her.
Not a tear rose to Burns' eye; and, while I paused from my sewing, because my fingers quivered at this spectacle with a sentiment of unavailing and impotent anger, not a feature of her pensive face altered its ordinary expression.