penthouse


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Related to penthouse: Stephen Hawking, maxim

pent·house

 (pĕnt′hous′)
n.
1.
a. An apartment or dwelling situated on the roof of a building.
b. A residence, often with a terrace, on the top floor or floors of a building.
c. A structure housing machinery on the roof of a building.
2. A shed or sloping roof attached to the side of a building or wall.
3. Sports The sloping roof that rises from the inner wall to the outer wall surrounding three sides of the court in court tennis, off which the ball is served.

[Alteration of Middle English pentis, pentace, a shed attached to a wall of a building, from Anglo-Norman pentiz, penthouses, from Old French apentiz, penthouse, from apent, past participle of apendre, to belong, depend, from Medieval Latin appendere, from Latin, to hang, suspend; see append.]
Word History: The status of the word penthouse has risen considerably in its history. The word ultimately goes back to Latin appendere, "to cause to be suspended." In Medieval Latin appendere developed the sense "to belong, depend," a sense that passed into apendre, the Old French development of appendere. From apent, the past participle of apendre, came the derivative apentiz, "low building behind or beside a house," and the Anglo-Norman plural form pentiz. The form without the a- was then borrowed into Middle English, giving us pentis, which was applied to sheds or lean-tos added on to buildings. Because these structures often had sloping roofs, the word was connected with the French word pente, "slope," and beginning in the 1500s, the second part of the word began to be associated with the word house, in its meaning "a building for human use," and spellings like penthouse begin to become common. The use of the term with reference to fancy apartments developed from its application to a structure built on a roof to cover such things as a stairway or an elevator shaft. Penthouse then came to mean an apartment built on a rooftop and finally the top floor of an apartment building.

penthouse

(ˈpɛntˌhaʊs)
n
1. (Architecture) a flat or maisonette built onto the top floor or roof of a block of flats
2. (Architecture) a construction on the roof of a building, esp one used to house machinery
3. (Architecture) a shed built against a building, esp one that has a sloping roof
4. (Tennis) real tennis the roofed corridor that runs along three sides of the court
[C14 pentis (later penthouse, by folk etymology), from Old French apentis, from Late Latin appendicium appendage, from Latin appendere to hang from; see appendix]

pent•house

(ˈpɛntˌhaʊs)

n., pl. -hous•es (-ˌhaʊ zɪz)
1. an apartment or dwelling on the roof of a building, usu. set back from the outer walls.
2. any specially designed apartment on an upper floor, esp. the top floor, of a building.
3. a structure on a roof for housing elevator machinery, a water tank, etc.
4. a sloping roof or a shed with a sloping roof projecting from a wall or the side of a building, as to shelter a door.
[1520–30; alter. (by folk etym.) of Middle English pentis < Old French apentiz=apent, past participle of apendre to hang against]

penthouse

1. An outhouse with a lean-to roof.
2. A separate structure on the roof of a high rise building.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.penthouse - an apartment located on the top floors of a buildingpenthouse - an apartment located on the top floors of a building
apartment, flat - a suite of rooms usually on one floor of an apartment house
Translations
půdní byt
penthouse
tetõlakás
òakíbúî
butas pastogėje
luksus dzīvoklis augšstāvā
byt na streche

penthouse

[ˈpenthaʊs] N (penthouses (pl)) [ˈpenthaʊzɪz]ático m

penthouse

[ˈpɛnthaʊs] n (also penthouse apartment, penthouse flat) (British)appartement m (de luxe) au dernier étagepent-up [ˌpɛntˈʌp] adj [feelings] → refoulé(e)

penthouse

n (= apartment)Penthouse nt, → Dachterrassenwohnung f; (= roof)Überdachung f

penthouse

[ˈpɛntˌhaʊs] nattico

penthouse

(ˈpenthaus) noun
a (usually luxurious) flat at the top of a building. That apartment building has a beautiful penthouse; (also adjective) a penthouse flat.
References in classic literature ?
She had precisely the same shape of skull as Pope Alexander the Sixth; her organs of benevolence, veneration, conscientiousness, adhesiveness, were singularly small, those of self-esteem, firmness, destructiveness, combativeness, preposterously large; her head sloped up in the penthouse shape, was contracted about the forehead, and prominent behind; she had rather good, though large and marked features; her temperament was fibrous and bilious, her complexion pale and dark, hair and eyes black, form angular and rigid but proportionate, age fifteen.
D'Artagnan stopped the postilion who rode the pack-horse, at the corner of the Rue des Lombards, under a penthouse, and calling one of Planchet's boys, he desired him not only to take care of the two horses, but to watch the postilion; after which he entered the shop of the grocer, who had just finished supper, and who, in his little private room, was, with a degree of anxiety, consulting the calendar, on which, every evening, he scratched out the day that was past.
Then for the third time they came together, and at first Eric strove to be wary, as he had been before; but, growing mad at finding himself so foiled, he lost his wits and began to rain blows so fiercely and so fast that they rattled like hail on penthouse roof; but, in spite of all, he did not reach within Little John's guard.
Above Pierre's head some pigeons, disturbed by the movement he had made in sitting up, fluttered under the dark roof of the penthouse.
For a moment as he was rearranging his cloak Pierre opened his eyes and saw the same penthouse roofs, posts, and yard, but now they were all bluish, lit up, and glittering with frost or dew.
Vasili Andreevich went into the room with the old man, and Nikita drove through the gate opened for him by Petrushka, by whose advice he backed the horse under the penthouse.
Having wallowed for two hours through the deep sand of the eucalyptus forest, he fell exhausted against the penthouse door.
Yet the sunlight shone in at the ugly garret-window, which had a penthouse to itself thrust out among the tiles; and on the cracked and smoke-blackened parapet beyond, some of the deluded sparrows of the place rheumatically hopped, like little feathered cripples who had left their crutches in their nests; and there was a play of living leaves at hand that changed the air, and made an imperfect sort of music in it that would have been melody in the country.
Here Joe (who had left the room on the conclusion of their short dialogue) was protecting himself and the horse from the rain under the shelter of an old penthouse roof.
Some final wooden steps conducted them, stooping under a low penthouse roof, to the house-top.
The doors and shutters were painted green, and the underside of the penthouses had been lined with deal boards in the German fashion, and painted white.
Penthouse Two, priced at $13,965 million, has a 75 ft.