people of color


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people of color

n.
Plural of person of color.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.people of color - a race with skin pigmentation different from the white race (especially Blacks)
race - people who are believed to belong to the same genetic stock; "some biologists doubt that there are important genetic differences between races of human beings"
person of color, person of colour - (formal) any non-European non-white person
References in periodicals archive ?
At the microsystem level, role models are needed for people of color and White women in many employment and educational settings (Eccles, 1987).
Among people of color "racism" has been all but ignored in the scholarly literature.
It would be nice if people were not exploited, cultures not devalued, land and resources not appropriated, primarily because they are those of Indigenous people and people of color.
Some of our white parishioners are still blissfully unaware of (or try to overlook) today's racism and the maddening frustrations people of color still face.
So information about the WTO and all the plans for Seattle did not reach many people of color.
Thus began a decade of studies, initiatives, and a profession-wide commitment to emphasize recruitment among people of color (Josey, 1999; McCook & Lippincott, 1997a; McCook & Lippincott, 1997b; McCook & Geist, 1993; McCook & Gonsalves, 1993).
Niebuhr knew that white people did not have a leg to stand on before the bar of God's justice regarding their treatment of people of color.
The people of color have terrible stories to tell: They suffer frequent abuse in white America, and they are sick of it.
The central argument of this book seems simple enough: that racial prejudice and discrimination undermined the opportunities for social and economic mobility of people of color in Puerto Rico throughout the nineteenth century.
The paucity of people of color on the Christian Coalition conference program signified a shift from the 1996 and 1997 events.
That is the conclusion of "The Color of Money," a September study by Public Campaign, which documents a massive imbalance in federal campaign contributions by whites and people of color.
The switch from race to class preferences saw an overall decline in minority enrollment, then, but it seems odd to use the term "whiteout" to refer to a class that is -- after the end of racial preference -- 35 percent people of color.