peoplehood


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

peo·ple·hood

 (pē′pəl-ho͝od′)
n.
The condition of being a people or one of a people: "As symbols go, few are as national and sectarian as the menorah. It is the symbol of Jewish peoplehood" (Charles Krauthammer).

peoplehood

(ˈpiːpəlhʊd)
n
1. (Sociology) the state or condition of being, or of belonging to, a (unified) people
2. (Sociology) the sense of being, or being part of, a (unified) people
References in periodicals archive ?
The true Europe, on the other hand, encompasses a number of fundamental elements--a body of law that applies to all yet is limited in its demands; a shared understanding of political and cultural traditions and a fealty to those traditions; an appreciation of the nation state as "the political form that joins peoplehood with sovereignty"; a shared regard for the role of the Classical tradition in shaping the Western mind; and an understanding of Christianity as the religious bulwark of the civilization.
As an Israeli citizen," Spencer told his Israeli interviewer, "someone who understands your identity, who has a sense of nationhood and peoplehood and the history and experience of the Jewish people, you should respect someone like me who has analogous feelings about whites.
Weaving together religious and secular philosophy with allusions to the natural world, Shapiro used the Pesakh story as a medium for expressing his beliefs about Jewish peoplehood, politics, and the prospects for "future human liberation.
The author's focus on diverse multiracial communities thus forces readers to rethink definitions of "African history" and the new forms of peoplehood and political imagination that emerged during colonial rule in the region of the British Central Africa Federation.
AJU's focus on scholarship, culture, ethics, leadership, and peoplehood are very much in line with my own personal values which have inspired my work in our community for over four decades.
To this day, the nervous oscillation between crowds and peoplehood intrinsic to this form of government has inflected the republic's institutions and constructs, which are haunted and imbued from within by the crowds they otherwise set out to mold, enframe, and address.
Baumgarten, "From Watts to Rodney King: Peoplehood, Politics, and Citizenship in Jewish Los Angeles, 1965-1992," (forthcoming doctoral dissertation, Department of History, University of California, Los Angeles,); Robert L.
Memoirs of Soviet Mennonites (among many others) appearing in the post-Soviet era, convey more of the common suffering, and more of the sense of a common peoplehood in spite of the corruptions that plagued, and still plague the territories of the former Soviet Union.
I wish I knew whether he identifies with Jewish peoplehood or considers us just another religion.
That enigma is at the heart of "Jewish Identity: The Challenge of Peoplehood Today" by Ruth Shamir as it explores the history at times tragic, at times triumphant of the evolution of Jewish identity in the modern era.
Chris Andersen, "Metis": Race, Recognition, and the Struggle for Indigenous Peoplehood (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press 2014)
Israeli necropolitics has not taken a once-for-all genocidal form, but rather works slowly and inconspicuously to destroy all fields in which Palestinian peoplehood is reproduced.