peoples


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Related to peoples: Peoples Temple

peo·ple

 (pē′pəl)
n. pl. people
1.
a. Humans considered as a group or in indefinite numbers. Often treated as a plural of person, alone and in compounds: People were dancing in the street. I met all sorts of people. This book is not intended for laypeople.
b. The mass of ordinary persons; the populace. Used with the: "those who fear and distrust the people, and wish to draw all powers from them into the hands of the higher classes" (Thomas Jefferson).
2.
a. A body of persons living in the same country under one national government; a nationality.
b. The citizens of a political unit, such as a nation or state; the electorate. Used with the.
3. pl. peo·ples A body of persons sharing a common religion, culture, or language: the peoples of central Asia.
4.
a. Persons with regard to their residence, class, profession, or group: city people; farming people.
b. Persons subordinate to or loyal to a ruler, superior, or employer: The manager would like to introduce you to our people in the regional office.
c. A person's family, relatives, or ancestors: Where are your people from?
5. Informal Animals or other beings distinct from humans: Rabbits and squirrels are the furry little people of the woods.
tr.v. peo·pled, peo·pling, peo·ples
1. To settle or inhabit with people; populate.
2. To be present in or on (a place): "The stores ... are peopled by serious shoppers" (Perri Klass).

[Middle English peple, from Old French pueple, from Latin populus, of Etruscan origin.]

peo′pler n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.peoples - the human beings of a particular nation or community or ethnic group; "the indigenous peoples of Australia"
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
people - (plural) any group of human beings (men or women or children) collectively; "old people"; "there were at least 200 people in the audience"
References in classic literature ?
Is the ferment of the peoples of the west at the end of the eighteenth century and their drive eastward explained by the activity of Louis XIV, XV, and XVI, their mistresses and ministers, and by the lives of Napoleon, Rousseau, Diderot, Beaumarchais, and others?
Many lands saw Zarathustra, and many peoples: thus he discovered the good and bad of many peoples.
And such a momentary impulse there is not, and there cannot be, in the case of the oppression of the Slavonic peoples.
I say then that such a principality is obtained either by the favour of the people or by the favour of the nobles.
WHEN the people of America reflect that they are now called upon to decide a question, which, in its consequences, must prove one of the most important that ever engaged their attention, the propriety of their taking a very comprehensive, as well as a very serious, view of it, will be evident.
Now, my father, my story winds back again as the river bends towards its source, and I tell of those events which happened at the king's kraal of Gibamaxegu, which you white people name Gibbeclack, the kraal that is called "Pick-out-the-old-men," for it was there that Chaka murdered all the aged who were unfit for war.
It is evident that no other form would be reconcilable with the genius of the people of America; with the fundamental principles of the Revolution; or with that honorable determination which animates every votary of freedom, to rest all our political experiments on the capacity of mankind for self-government.
But the time was come when he could not be a friend to the people without ceasing to be a friend to the king.
His father and mother were poor farmer people, and James ran about barefooted and wild among the hills and glens.
The voices of the Fire People at first alarmed us, but later, when darkness had come, we were attracted by the fire.
Nor should they define an oligarchy a government where the supreme power is in the hands of a few: for let us suppose the number of a people to be thirteen hundred, and that of these one thousand were rich, who would not permit the three hundred poor to have any share in the government, although they were free, and their equal in everything else; no one would say, that this government was a democracy.
One night in the chapel, after the usual chapel exercises were over, General Armstrong referred to the fact that he had received a letter from some gentlemen in Alabama asking him to recommend some one to take charge of what was to be a normal school for the coloured people in the little town of Tuskegee in that state.