perambulation


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per·am·bu·late

 (pə-răm′byə-lāt′)
v. per·am·bu·lat·ed, per·am·bu·lat·ing, per·am·bu·lates
v.tr.
1. To walk through.
2. To inspect (an area) on foot.
v.intr.
To walk about; roam or stroll.

[Latin perambulāre, perambulāt- : per-, per- + ambulāre, to walk; see ambhi in Indo-European roots.]

per·am′bu·la′tion n.
per·am′bu·la·to′ry (-lə-tôr′ē) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.perambulation - a walk around a territory (a parish or manor or forest etc.) in order to officially assert and record its boundaries
walk - the act of walking somewhere; "he took a walk after lunch"
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
2.perambulation - a leisurely walk (usually in some public place)perambulation - a leisurely walk (usually in some public place)
ramble, meander - an aimless amble on a winding course
walk - the act of walking somewhere; "he took a walk after lunch"
walkabout - a public stroll by a celebrity to meet people informally

perambulation

noun
An act of walking, especially for pleasure:
amble, meander (often used in plural), promenade, ramble, saunter, stroll, walk, wander.
Translations

perambulation

[pəˌræmbjʊˈleɪʃən] N (frm, hum) (= stroll) → paseo m; (= journey) → viaje m; (= visit) → visita f de inspección

perambulation

n (form)Spaziergang m
References in classic literature ?
Fichez-moi la paix," she said, and pushing him on one side continued her perambulation.
He started off to make another perambulation of the table; then when he had come to the door again he stopped, glaring in from the height of two steps.
Edna and her father looked very distinguished together, and excited a good deal of notice during their perambulations.
My perambulations had given me, meanwhile, no glimpse of him, but they had tended to make more public the change taking place in our relation as a consequence of his having at the piano, the day before, kept me, in Flora's interest, so beguiled and befooled.
The light cart in which the Brigand usually made his perambulations being gaily dressed with flags and streamers, and the Brigand placed therein, contemplating the miniature of his beloved as usual, Nell was accommodated with a seat beside him, decorated with artificial flowers, and in this state and ceremony rode slowly through the town every morning, dispersing handbills from a basket, to the sound of drum and trumpet.
And with all the swiftness of his legs, already a little fatigued however, with the perambulations of the day, D'Artagnan directed his course toward M.
All these, however, were mere terrors of the night, phantoms of the mind that walk in darkness; and though he had seen many spectres in his time, and been more than once beset by Satan in divers shapes, in his lonely perambulations, yet daylight put an end to all these evils; and he would have passed a pleasant life of it, in despite of the Devil and all his works, if his path had not been crossed by a being that causes more perplexity to mortal man than ghosts, goblins, and the whole race of witches put together, and that was--a woman.
But matters were no sooner in this state, than he devoted all his spare time (and got up earlier to make it more) to these perambulations.
But as a sedentary home worker, I am already on the back foot, because incidental perambulation, of the kind I did so much of in my twenties, has to be artificially shoehorned into my weekdays, which, on some days (particularly not-enough-hours-in-the-day days), feels at best an inconvenience and at worse a crashing bore.
So it seems we'd all benefit from a bit more perambulation.
Or ban their use altogether during perambulation with glass-sided shelters provided at intervals where they can stop off and make a call.
It is like a slow perambulation around an English country garden in the company of a knowledgeable gardener, which indeed Sackville-West became.