perception


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to perception: visual perception

per·cep·tion

 (pər-sĕp′shən)
n.
1.
a. The process of perceiving something with the senses: the perception of a faint sound.
b. An instance of this: sense perceptions.
2.
a. The process or state of being aware of something: the perception of time.
b. Insight or knowledge gained by thinking: the perception that inheritance must be coded in DNA.
c. The capacity for such insight or knowledge: theories of how to enhance human perception.
d. An insight or point of knowledge: The article is full of astute perceptions.
3. An interpretation or impression; an opinion or belief: doctors working to change the public perception of certain diseases.

[Middle English percepcioun, from Old French percepcion, from Latin perceptiō, perceptiōn-, from perceptus, past participle of percipere, to perceive; see perceive.]

per·cep′tion·al adj.

perception

(pəˈsɛpʃən)
n
1. the act or the effect of perceiving
2. insight or intuition gained by perceiving
3. the ability or capacity to perceive
4. way of perceiving; awareness or consciousness; view: advertising affects the customer's perception of a product.
5. (Zoology) the process by which an organism detects and interprets information from the external world by means of the sensory receptors
6. (Law) law the collection, receipt, or taking into possession of rents, crops, etc
[C15: from Latin perceptiō comprehension; see perceive]
perˈceptional adj

per•cep•tion

(pərˈsɛp ʃən)

n.
1. the act or faculty of apprehending by means of the senses or the mind; cognition; awareness.
2. a single unified awareness derived from sensory processes while a stimulus is present.
3. immediate or intuitive recognition or appreciation, as of moral, psychological, or aesthetic qualities; insight; discernment.
4. the result or product of perceiving; percept.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Old French) < Latin perceptiō gathering in, perception. See perceive, -tion]
per•cep′tion•al, adj.

Perception


the system of philosophical idealism developed by George Berkeley (1685?-1753), especially his tenet that the physical world does not have an independent reality but exists as a perception of the divine mind and the flnite mind of man. Also Berkeleyism.Berkeleian, Berkeleyan, n., adj.
Medicine. the association of imaginary sensations of color with actual perceptions of hearing, taste, or smell. Also called photism, color hearing. Cf. synesthesia.
the combination of organic sensations that comprise an individual’s awareness of bodily existence. — coenesthetic, cenesthetic, adj.
an impaired condition of any of the senses.
Medicine. the sense by which movement, weight, position, etc. are perceived. — kinesthetic, adj.
extreme acuteness or sensitivity of the sense of taste.
an extremely heightened acuteness of the eyesight, resulting from increased sensibility of the retina.
heightened acuteness of the sense of smell.
the total or collective experience of all sensations or all the senses. — panesthetic, panaesthetic, adj.
any abnormal physical sensation, as itching, a tickling feeling, etc. — paresthetic, paraesthetic, adj.
a vision or other perception of something that has no physical or objective reality, as a ghost or other supernatural apparition. Also phantasma. See also images; philosophy.
a sound or a sensation of hearing produced by stimulus of another sense, as taste, smell, etc.
chromesthesia.
the sensory apparatus of the body as a whole; the seat of physical sensation, imagined to be in the gray matter of the brain.
Medicine. a secondary sensation accompanying an actual perception, as the perceiving of sound as a color or the sensation of being touched in a place at some distance from the actual place of touching. Cf. chromesthesia.synesthetic, synaesthetic, adj.
a form of extrasensory perception, working over a distance and enabling the so gifted observer to perceive events, objects, etc., far away. — telesthetic, telaesthetic, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.perception - the representation of what is perceivedperception - the representation of what is perceived; basic component in the formation of a concept
internal representation, mental representation, representation - a presentation to the mind in the form of an idea or image
figure - a unitary percept having structure and coherence that is the object of attention and that stands out against a ground
ground - a relatively homogeneous percept extending back of the figure on which attention is focused
pattern, form, shape - a perceptual structure; "the composition presents problems for students of musical form"; "a visual pattern must include not only objects but the spaces between them"
visual percept, visual image - a percept that arises from the eyes; an image in the visual system
2.perception - a way of conceiving something; "Luther had a new perception of the Bible"
3.perception - the process of perceiving
basic cognitive process - cognitive processes involved in obtaining and storing knowledge
perceptual constancy, constancy - (psychology) the tendency for perceived objects to give rise to very similar perceptual experiences in spite of wide variations in the conditions of observation
detection, sensing - the perception that something has occurred or some state exists; "early detection can often lead to a cure"
beholding, seeing, visual perception - perception by means of the eyes
auditory perception, sound perception - the perception of sound as a meaningful phenomenon
aesthesis, esthesis, sensation, sense datum, sense experience, sense impression - an unelaborated elementary awareness of stimulation; "a sensation of touch"
somaesthesia, somatesthesia, somatic sensation, somesthesia - the perception of tactual or proprioceptive or gut sensations; "he relied on somesthesia to warn him of pressure changes"
tactile sensation, tactual sensation, touch sensation, feeling, touch - the sensation produced by pressure receptors in the skin; "she likes the touch of silk on her skin"; "the surface had a greasy feeling"
4.perception - knowledge gained by perceiving; "a man admired for the depth of his perception"
cognition, knowledge, noesis - the psychological result of perception and learning and reasoning
discernment, perceptiveness - perception of that which is obscure
insight, penetration - clear or deep perception of a situation
cognizance - range or scope of what is perceived
5.perception - becoming aware of something via the senses
sensory activity - activity intended to achieve a particular sensory result
looking, looking at, look - the act of directing the eyes toward something and perceiving it visually; "he went out to have a look"; "his look was fixed on her eyes"; "he gave it a good looking at"; "his camera does his looking for him"
listening, hearing - the act of hearing attentively; "you can learn a lot by just listening"; "they make good music--you should give them a hearing"
lipreading - perceiving what a person is saying by observing the movements of the lips
tasting, taste - a kind of sensing; distinguishing substances by means of the taste buds; "a wine tasting"
smelling, smell - the act of perceiving the odor of something

perception

perception

noun
1. The condition of being aware:
2. That which exists in the mind as the product of careful mental activity:
Translations
إدْراكادراك حسي
vjemvnímánívnímavost
intelligens
aistimushavainto
percepcijavid
skynjun, skilningur
nuovokumaspajautimaspastabiaipastabumas
izpratneuztvere
algılama gücüanlayışgörüş

perception

[pəˈsepʃən] N
1. (= act) → percepción f
it changes one's perception of timecambia la percepción que uno tiene del tiempo
sense perceptionpercepción f sensorial
2. (= impression) → impresión f
what is your perception of the situation?¿qué impresión tienes de la situación?
her perception was that she had done sth wrongtenía la impresión de haberse equivocado en algo
the public perception is thatla gente tiene la impresión de que ...
3. (= insight) → perspicacia f, agudeza f

perception

[pərˈsɛpʃən] n
(= view) → perception f
our perception of time → notre perception du temps
(= understanding) → perspicacité f

perception

n
no plWahrnehmung f; his colour perception is impairedseine Farbwahrnehmung ist beeinträchtigt; his powers of perceptionsein Wahrnehmungsvermögen nt
(= mental image, conception)Auffassung f(of von); he seems to have a clear perception of the dilemma I faceer scheint meine schwierige Lage vollauf zu erkennen; one’s perception of the situationdie eigene Einschätzung der Lage
no pl (= perceptiveness)Einsicht f; (= perceptive remark, observation)Beobachtung f
no pl (= act of perceiving) (of object, visible difference)Wahrnehmung f; (of difficulties, meaning, illogicality etc)Erkennen nt; his quick perception of the danger saved us all from deathweil er die Gefahr blitzschnell erkannte, rettete er uns allen das Leben

perception

[pəˈsɛpʃn] n (gen) → percezione f; (sensitiveness) → sensibilità; (insight) → perspicacia
one's perception of a situation → il proprio modo di vedere una situazione

perception

(pəˈsepʃən) noun
the ability to see, understand etc clearly. a man of great perception.
perˈceptive (-tiv) adjective
able to see, understand etc clearly. a very perceptive man.
perˈceptively adverb
perˈceptiveness noun

per·cep·tion

n. percepción, acción de ser consciente de un estímulo sensorial;
extrasensory ______ extrasensorial.

perception

n percepción f; depth — percepción de la profundidad
References in classic literature ?
Clothing their ideas in the most remote and subtle images, they betrayed, that, in the short period of their intercourse, they had discovered, with the intuitive perception of their sex, the truant disposition of his inclinations.
Her hereditary reverence made her afraid to judge the character of the original so harshly as a perception of the truth compelled her to do.
My conclusion was that he had no soul, no heart, no mind; nothing, as I have already said, but instincts; and yet, withal, so cunningly had the few materials of his character been put together that there was no painful perception of deficiency, but, on my part, an entire contentment with what I found in him.
My second was a violent perception of the mistake of my first: the man who met my eyes was not the person I had precipitately supposed.
Gifted with the high perception, I lack the low, enjoying power; damned, most subtly and most malignantly
When horses and vehicles began to move along the highway, with that alert perception peculiar to a state of excitement, and which seems to be a sort of inspiration, she became aware that her headlong pace and distracted air might bring on her remark and suspicion.
Action from principle, the perception and the performance of right, changes things and relations; it is essentially revolutionary, and does not consist wholly with anything which was.
And how strange is this marvel, and how awful -- that to the one per- ception it is enchanted and dight in a base and shame- ful aspect; yet to the perception of the other it is not enchanted, hath suffered no change, but stands firm and stately still, girt with its moat and waving its ban- ners in the blue air from its towers.
I always hate to fool away a humorous thing on a person who has no perception of humor; and it filled me with bitterness when this man went soberly away to submit the last proposition to his principal.
I think I never hated slavery so intensely as at that moment; certainly, my perception of the enormous outrage which is in- flicted by it, on the godlike nature of its victims, was rendered far more clear than ever.
His perception of the striking improvement of Harriet's manner, since her introduction at Hartfield, was not one of the least agreeable proofs of his growing attachment.
John had said another word; but I cannot expect the reader to have the same intuitive perception, so I must repeat his explanation.