perdition


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per·di·tion

 (pər-dĭsh′ən)
n.
1.
a. Loss of the soul; eternal damnation.
b. Hell: "Him the Almighty Power / Hurl'd headlong ... / To bottomless perdition, there to dwell" (John Milton).
2. Utter ruin.

[Middle English perdicion, from Old French, from Late Latin perditiō, perditiōn-, from Latin perditus, past participle of perdere, to lose : per-, per- + dare, to give; see dō- in Indo-European roots.]

perdition

(pəˈdɪʃən)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity
a. final and irrevocable spiritual ruin
b. this state as one that the wicked are said to be destined to endure for ever
2. (Theology) another word for hell
3. archaic utter disaster, ruin, or destruction
[C14: from Late Latin perditiō ruin, from Latin perdere to lose, from per- (away) + dāre to give]

per•di•tion

(pərˈdɪʃ ən)

n.
1. a state of final spiritual ruin; loss of the soul; damnation.
2. hell.
3. Archaic. utter destruction or ruin.
[1300–50; Middle English perdiciun (< Old French) < Latin perditiō destruction, derivative (with -tiō -tion) of perdere to ruin, lose =per- per- + -dere; see add]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.perdition - (Christianity) the abode of Satan and the forces of evilperdition - (Christianity) the abode of Satan and the forces of evil; where sinners suffer eternal punishment; "Hurl'd headlong...To bottomless perdition, there to dwell"- John Milton; "a demon from the depths of the pit"; "Hell is paved with good intentions"-Dr. Johnson
fictitious place, imaginary place, mythical place - a place that exists only in imagination; a place said to exist in fictional or religious writings
Gehenna, Tartarus - a place where the wicked are punished after death
hellfire, red region - a place of eternal fire envisaged as punishment for the damned
Christian religion, Christianity - a monotheistic system of beliefs and practices based on the Old Testament and the teachings of Jesus as embodied in the New Testament and emphasizing the role of Jesus as savior

perdition

noun (Christianity) damnation, hell, ruin, destruction, doom, condemnation, downfall, hellfire, everlasting punishment He alleged that the film would lead young souls into perdition.
Translations
ад
helvettikadotustuho
helvete

perdition

[pɜːˈdɪʃən] N (liter) → perdición f

perdition

References in classic literature ?
Was he concocting a final plan of death for her and of perdition for himself?
Rosamond had that morning entreated him to urge this step on Lydgate; and it seemed to him as if he were beholding in a magic panorama a future where he himself was sliding into that pleasureless yielding to the small solicitations of circumstance, which is a commoner history of perdition than any single momentous bargain.
But he found himself encompassed with guards and forced to remain silent while the Chief Circle in a few impassioned words made a final appeal to the Women, exclaiming that, if the Colour Bill passed, no marriage would henceforth be safe, no woman's honour secure; fraud, deception, hypocrisy would pervade every household; domestic bliss would share the fate of the Constitution and pass to speedy perdition.
Tito Malema was not only a lesson, he was a revelation, and I trembled before him as in the presence of a warning and a message from the only veritable perdition.
But what I was going to say, when I spoke of the rock being suspended, was, that in the floor of the cavern under it they showed us a slab which they said covered a hole which was a thing of extraordinary interest to all Mohammedans, because that hole leads down to perdition, and every soul that is transferred from thence to Heaven must pass up through this orifice.
Thus differently from the adversaries of the proposed Constitution should I reason on the same subject, deducing arguments of safety from the very sources which they represent as fraught with danger and perdition.
She described with the most vivid minuteness the agonies of the country families whom he had ruined-- the sons whom he had plunged into dishonour and poverty--the daughters whom he had inveigled into perdition.
As such a man, however, was not of much practical use in the ship, especially as he refused to work except when he pleased, the incredulous captain would fain have been rid of him; but apprised that that individual's intention was to land him in the first convenient port, the archangel forthwith opened all his seals and vials -- devoting the ship and all hands to unconditional perdition, in case this intention was carried out.
Merlin, the mighty liar and magician, perdition singe him for the weariness he worketh with his one tale
Formerly," replied Bazin, "Aramis was his name of perdition.
I find my follies are irretrievable; and all your goodness cannot save me from perdition.
Hoover, forty-five, flush and foolish, might carry off Helen herself; Hoover, forty-five, flush, foolish and fat is meat for perdition.