performing

(redirected from performings)
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per·form

 (pər-fôrm′)
v. per·formed, per·form·ing, per·forms
v.tr.
1. To begin and carry through to completion; do: The surgeon performed the operation.
2. To take action in accordance with the requirements of; fulfill: perform one's contractual obligations.
3.
a. To enact (a feat or role) before an audience.
b. To give a public presentation of; present: My theater group performed a three-act play.
v.intr.
1. To function or accomplish something as expected or required: a car that performs well on curves; workers not performing up to standard.
2. To yield a return on investment: stocks that performed well.
3. To portray a role or demonstrate a skill before an audience: The juggler performed atop a unicycle.
4. To present a dramatic or musical work or other entertainment before an audience.

[Middle English performen, from Anglo-Norman performer, from Old French parfornir : par-, intensive pref. (from Latin per-, per-) + fournir, to furnish; see furnish.]

per·form′a·ble adj.
per·form′er n.
Synonyms: perform, execute, accomplish, achieve
These verbs signify to carry through to completion. To perform is to carry out an action, undertaking, or procedure, often with great skill or care. The ship's captain performed the wedding ceremony. Laser experiments are performed regularly in the laboratory.
Execute implies performing a task or putting something into effect in accordance with a plan or design: "To execute laws is a royal office; to execute orders is not to be a king" (Edmund Burke).
Accomplish connotes the successful completion of something, often of something that requires tenacity or talent: "Make one brave push and see what can be accomplished in a week" (Robert Louis Stevenson).
To achieve is to accomplish something, often something significant, especially despite difficulty: "Some are born great ... Some achieve greatness ... And some have greatness thrust upon them" (Shakespeare).

performing

(pəˈfɔːmɪŋ)
adj
(of an animal) trained to perform tricks before an audience, as in a circus

Performing


showmanship or any activity taking advantage of people’s credulity or desire for sensational entertainment, as practiced by P. T. Barnum (1810-91).
a participant in a noisy mock serenade, as a charivari.
a mock serenade accompanied by much noise and revelry, often played as a joke on newly married couples.
a strip tease dancer.
one who performs feats that require an unusual sense of balance, as a tightrope walker.
the art or technique of escaping from chains, locked trunks, etc., as a form of entertainment. — escapist, n., adj.
the art or skill of tightrope walking. — funambulist, n.
a performance involving Harlequin or other characters of the Commedia dell’Arte; hence, buffoonery or clownish behavior. Also called harlequinery.
a conjurer or magician who creates illusions, as by sleight of hand.
the art of the juggler.
skill in or practice of feats of dexterity that create a magical illusion. — legerdemainist, n.
the art or practice of copying or imitating closely, especially by a person for the purpose of entertainment. See also biology. — mimic, mimical, adj.
1. the art of performing monologues.
2. Obsolete, a monologue.
1. a performance by mummers, performers wearing masks or fantastic disguises.
2. any showy but empty performance.
the art of mute acting. — pantomimist, n.
a humorous performance at the piano, sometimes with a verbal accompaniment by the performer.
the art of legerdemain; sleight of hand. — prestidigitator, n.prestidigitatorial, prestidigitatory, adj.
the art of making and handling puppets.
a person who recites poetry or other literary excerpts for entertainment.
an image formed by a shadow cast upon a lighted surface, as one formed by the hands for entertainment. — shadowgraphist, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.performing - the performance of a part or role in a dramaperforming - the performance of a part or role in a drama
activity - any specific behavior; "they avoided all recreational activity"
personation, portrayal, characterization, enactment - acting the part of a character on stage; dramatically representing the character by speech and action and gesture
personation, impersonation - imitating the mannerisms of another person
method acting, method - an acting technique introduced by Stanislavsky in which the actor recalls emotions or reactions from his or her own life and uses them to identify with the character being portrayed
dumb show, pantomime, mime - a performance using gestures and body movements without words
byplay, stage business, business - incidental activity performed by an actor for dramatic effect; "his business with the cane was hilarious"
performance - the act of presenting a play or a piece of music or other entertainment; "we congratulated him on his performance at the rehearsal"; "an inspired performance of Mozart's C minor concerto"
skit - a short theatrical episode
hamming, overacting - poor acting by a ham actor
heroics - ostentatious or vainglorious or extravagant or melodramatic conduct; "heroics are for those epic films they make in Hollywood"
reenactment - performing a role in an event that occurred at an earlier time; "the reenactment of the battle of Princeton"
roleplaying - acting a particular role (as in psychotherapy)
performing arts - arts or skills that require public performance
Translations

performing

[pəˈfɔːmɪŋ]
A. ADJ [animal] → amaestrado
B. CPD performing arts NPLartes fpl de la interpretación

performing

[pərˈfɔːrmɪŋ] adj [animal] → savant(e)performing arts npl
the performing arts → les arts mpl du spectacle

performing

adj animaldressiert; artistdarstellend; the performing artsdie darstellenden Künste; performing rightsAufführungsrechte pl

performing

[pəˈfɔːmɪŋ] adj (animal) → ammaestrato/a
a performing seal → una foca ammaestrata
References in classic literature ?
After performing at Sheffield and Manchester, we have moved to Liverpool, Preston, and Lancaster.
It is also proper, that for performing these exercises the citizens should be divided into distinct classes, according to their ages, and that the young persons should have proper officers to be with them, and that the seniors should be with the magistrates; for having them before their eyes would greatly inspire true modesty and ingenuous fear.
His business in life, whereby he lived, was to appear in a cage of performing leopards before vast audiences, and to thrill those audiences by certain exhibitions of nerve for which his employers rewarded him on a scale commensurate with the thrills he produced.
They chatted incessantly: about the things around them; their amusing adventure out in the water-it had again assumed its entertaining aspect; about the wind, the trees, the people who had gone to the Cheniere; about the children playing croquet under the oaks, and the Farival twins, who were now performing the overture to "The Poet and the Peasant.
And human nature, Adeimantus, appears to have been coined into yet smaller pieces, and to be as incapable of imitating many things well, as of performing well the actions of which the imitations are copies.
To this I added another petition, "that for the sake of my patron the king of Luggnagg, his majesty would condescend to excuse my performing the ceremony imposed on my countrymen, of trampling upon the crucifix: because I had been thrown into his kingdom by my misfortunes, without any intention of trading.
And so without particularly analyzing all the contiguous sections of a cone and of the ranks of an army, or the ranks and positions in any administrative or public business whatever from the lowest to the highest, we see a law by which men, to take associated action, combine in such relations that the more directly they participate in performing the action the less they can command and the more numerous they are, while the less their direct participation in the action itself, the more they command and the fewer of them there are; rising in this way from the lowest ranks to the man at the top, who takes the least direct share in the action and directs his activity chiefly to commanding.
Though indeed I fail to comprehend how, with the independence you show," he went on, getting hot, "--announcing your infidelity to your husband and seeing nothing reprehensible in it, apparently--you can see anything reprehensible in performing a wife's duties in relation to your husband.
In drawing this calico slowly from his bosom inch by inch, Toby reminded me of a juggler performing the feat of the endless ribbon.
My plan was to have them, while performing this service, taught the latest and best methods of labour, so that the school would not only get the benefit of their efforts, but the students themselves would be taught to see not only utility in labour, but beauty and dignity; would be taught, in fact, how to lift labour up from mere drudgery and toil, and would learn to love work for its own sake.
It was for this reason that the school was so popular a boarding-place for performing animals when the owners were on vacation or out of "time.
Merrylegs;' she whispered the awful fact; 'is his performing dog.