periodize

(redirected from periodizations)

periodize

(ˈpɪərɪəˌdaɪz) or

periodise

vb
to divide (a portion of time) into periods
References in periodicals archive ?
Convention holds Beckett's three novels </Molloy/>, </Malone meurt/Malone Dies/>, and </L'Innommable/The Unnamable/> to be one entity, say Hulle and Verhulst, and several periodizations of his career mark the end of the <The Unnamable/> as the watershed separating his middle period from his late prose.
2012) Linear and daily undulating resistance training periodizations have differential beneficial effects in young sedentary women.
The hermeneutic approach thus resorts to explanations such as the ones described previously, resulting in almost as many different periodizations as the number of critics that devise them.
Cuevas also suggests a scheme of his own, which has not however been adopted in either of these books; perhaps we have to settle for a multiplicity of periodizations.
In this integration, Keddie utilizes the standard periodizations of political
Many of the essays contained in the book aim at demonstrating how the reconstruction of the role played by 'minor' women writers in the literary process implicitly questions traditional interpretation and received periodizations of Russian literature.
The curiously weak first chapter is especially marred by misreadings or belittlings of other scholars' periodizations.
He avoids the traditional periodizations of the Renaissance and Reformation, even early modern, for in his view, the one places undue emphasis on cultural and religious changes and the other, one infers, on the economic and social.
We all do periodizations and we are all conditioned by the historiography of the subject we are examining.
Spring, summer, autumn, and winter are nature-made periodizations with which people have long understood changes in their environments and lives.
Continuity and change at the Poor House do not fall neatly into standard political periodizations.
Unlike these conventional sorts of periodizations, however, the decade represents a different strain of discontinuous time, one that has been neglected by historians.