period

(redirected from Periods)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Periods: first period, ovulation, irregular periods, Menstrual periods

pe·ri·od

 (pîr′ē-əd)
n.
1. An interval of time characterized by the occurrence of a certain condition, event, or phenomenon: a period of economic prosperity.
2. An interval of time characterized by the prevalence of a specified culture, ideology, or technology: artifacts of the pre-Columbian period.
3. An interval regarded as a distinct evolutionary or developmental phase: Picasso's early career is divided into his blue period and rose period.
4. Geology A unit of time, longer than an epoch and shorter than an era.
5. Any of various arbitrary units of time, especially:
a. Any of the divisions of the academic day.
b. Sports & Games A division of the playing time of a game.
6. Physics & Astronomy The time interval between two successive occurrences of a recurrent event or phases of an event; a cycle: the period of a satellite's orbit.
8. A point or portion of time at which something is ended; a completion or conclusion.
9. A punctuation mark ( . ) indicating a full stop, placed at the end of declarative sentences and other statements thought to be complete, and after many abbreviations.
10. The full pause at the end of a spoken sentence.
11. A sentence of several carefully balanced clauses in formal writing.
12.
a. A metrical unit of quantitative verse consisting of two or more cola.
b. An analogous unit or division of classical Greek or Latin prose.
13. Music A group of two or more phrases within a composition, often made up of 8 or 16 measures and terminating with a cadence.
14. Mathematics
a. The least interval in the range of the independent variable of a periodic function of a real variable in which all possible values of the dependent variable are assumed.
b. A group of digits separated by commas in a written number.
c. The number of digits that repeat in a repeating decimal. For example, 1/7 = 0.142857142857 ... has a six-digit period.
15. Chemistry A sequence of elements arranged in order of increasing atomic number and forming one of the horizontal rows in the periodic table.
adj.
Of, belonging to, or representing a certain historical age or time: a period piece; period furniture.
interj.
Used to emphasize finality, as when expressing a decision or an opinion: You're not going to the movies tonight, period!

[Middle English periode, from Old French, from Medieval Latin periodus, from Latin perihodos, rhetorical period, from Greek periodos, circuit : peri-, peri- + hodos, way.]
Word History: Many may have wondered why the word period has the sense "punctuation mark ( . )" as well as several senses having to do with time. The answer to this question lies in one of the senses of the Greek word periodos from which our word is descended. Periodos, made up of peri-, "around," and hodos, "way," in addition to meaning such things as "going around, way around, going around in a circle, circuit," and with regard to time, "cycle or period of time," referred in rhetoric to "a group of words organically related in grammar and sense." The Greek word was adopted into Latin as perihodos, which in the Medieval Latin period acquired a new sense related to its use in rhetoric, "a punctuation mark used at the end of a rhetorical period." This sense is not recorded in English until the late 1500s, but the word had already entered Middle English in the 1400s as a borrowing from Old French in the sense "a cycle of recurrence of a disease."

period

(ˈpɪərɪəd)
n
1. a portion of time of indefinable length: he spent a period away from home.
2.
a. a portion of time specified in some way: the Arthurian period; Picasso's blue period.
b. (as modifier): period costume.
3. (Physiology) a nontechnical name for an occurrence of menstruation
4. (Geological Science) geology a unit of geological time during which a system of rocks is formed: the Jurassic period.
5. (Education) a division of time, esp of the academic day
6. (General Physics) physics maths
a. the time taken to complete one cycle of a regularly recurring phenomenon; the reciprocal of frequency. Symbol: T
b. an interval in which the values of a periodic function follow a certain pattern that is duplicated over successive intervals: sin x = sin (x + 2π), where 2π is the period.
7. (Astronomy) astronomy
a. the time required by a body to make one complete rotation on its axis
b. the time interval between two successive maxima or minima of light variation of a variable star
8. (Chemistry) chem one of the horizontal rows of elements in the periodic table. Each period starts with an alkali metal and ends with a rare gas. Compare group11
9. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) Also called: full stop the punctuation mark (.) used at the end of a sentence that is not a question or exclamation, after abbreviations, etc
10. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a complete sentence, esp a complex one with several clauses
11. (Music, other) music Also called: sentence a passage or division of a piece of music, usually consisting of two or more contrasting or complementary musical phrases and ending on a cadence
12. (Poetry) (in classical prosody) a unit consisting of two or more cola
13. rare a completion or end
[C14 peryod, from Latin periodus, from Greek periodos circuit, from peri- + hodos way]

pe•ri•od

(ˈpɪər i əd)

n.
1. an extent of time that is meaningful in the life of a person, in history, etc.: a period of illness; a period of social unrest.
2. a specific division or portion of time: the postwar period.
3. a round of time, esp. as marked by the recurrence of some phenomenon: the rainy period.
4. any of the parts of equal length into which a particular thing, as a sports contest, is divided.
5. the time during which something is completed or runs its course: the gestation period.
6. the point or character (.) used esp. to mark the end of a declarative sentence or to indicate an abbreviation; full stop.
7. a full pause, as is made at the end of a complete sentence; full stop.
8. a sentence, esp. a well-balanced, impressive sentence.
10.
a. an occurrence of menstruation.
b. a time of the month during which menstruation occurs.
11. the basic unit of geologic time, during which a standard rock system is formed: comprising two or more epochs and included with other periods in an era.
12. Physics. the duration of one complete cycle of a wave or oscillation; the reciprocal of the frequency.
13. a division of a musical composition commonly consisting of two or more contrasted or complementary phrases ending with a cadence.
14. Astron.
a. the time in which a body rotates once on its axis.
b. the time in which a planet or satellite revolves once about its primary.
15. (in classical prosody) a group of two or more cola.
adj.
16. noting or pertaining to a historical period.
interj.
17. (used to indicate that a decision is final): I forbid you to go, period.
[1375–1425; < Middle French < Medieval Latin periodus, Latin < Greek períodos circuit, period of time, period in rhetoric]

pe·ri·od

(pĭr′ē-əd)
1. A division of geologic time, longer than an epoch and shorter than an era.
2. The time it takes for a regularly recurring action or event to be repeated; a cycle.
3. An instance or occurrence of menstruation.
4. Chemistry In the Periodic Table, any of the seven horizontal rows that contain elements arranged in order of increasing atomic number. All the elements in a particular period have the same number of electron shells in their atoms. See Periodic Table.

period

The time it takes for a satellite to complete one orbit around the earth. As a rule of thumb, satellites with periods of 87.5 minutes are on the verge of reentry.

period

1. A punctuation mark (.) that shows the end of a sentence or follows an abbreviation.
2. A geological time unit within an era.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.period - an amount of timeperiod - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue period"
fundamental measure, fundamental quantity - one of the four quantities that are the basis of systems of measurement
test period, trial period - a period of time during which someone or something is tested
time frame - a time period during which something occurs or is expected to occur; "an agreement can be reached in a reasonably short time frame"
hours - an indefinite period of time; "they talked for hours"
downtime - a period of time when something (as a machine or factory) is not operating (especially as a result of malfunctions)
uptime - a period of time when something (as a machine or factory) is functioning and available for use
work time - a time period when you are required to work
time off - a time period when you are not required to work; "he requested time off to attend his grandmother's funeral"
bout - a period of illness; "a bout of fever"; "a bout of depression"
hospitalization - a period of time when you are confined to a hospital; "now they try to shorten the patient's hospitalization"
travel time - a period of time spent traveling; "workers were not paid for their travel time between home and factory"
times - a more or less definite period of time now or previously present; "it was a sign of the times"
time - an indefinite period (usually marked by specific attributes or activities); "he waited a long time"; "the time of year for planting"; "he was a great actor in his time"
elapsed time - the time that elapses while some event is occurring
duration, continuance - the period of time during which something continues
calendar week, week - a period of seven consecutive days starting on Sunday
midweek - the middle of a week
field day - a time of unusual pleasure and success
lifespan, lifetime, life-time, life - the period during which something is functional (as between birth and death); "the battery had a short life"; "he lived a long and happy life"
life - the period between birth and the present time; "I have known him all his life"
life - the period from the present until death; "he appointed himself emperor for life"
millennium, millenary - a span of 1000 years
bimillenary, bimillennium - a span of 2000 years
occupation - the period of time during which a place or position or nation is occupied; "during the German occupation of Paris"
past - a earlier period in someone's life (especially one that they have reason to keep secret); "reporters dug into the candidate's past"
shelf life - the length of time a packaged food or drug will last without deteriorating
puerperium - time period following childbirth when the mother's uterus shrinks and the other functional and anatomic changes of pregnancy are resolved; "a perinatologist cared for her during the puerperium"
lactation - the period following birth during which milk is secreted; "lactation normally continues until weaning"
time of life - a period of time during which a person is normally in a particular life state
calendar day, civil day - a day reckoned from midnight to midnight
festival - a day or period of time set aside for feasting and celebration
daylight, daytime, day - the time after sunrise and before sunset while it is light outside; "the dawn turned night into day"; "it is easier to make the repairs in the daytime"
forenoon, morn, morning, morning time - the time period between dawn and noon; "I spent the morning running errands"
night, nighttime, dark - the time after sunset and before sunrise while it is dark outside
night - the time between sunset and midnight; "he watched television every night"
night - the period spent sleeping; "I had a restless night"
night - a period of ignorance or backwardness or gloom
eve - the period immediately before something; "on the eve of the French Revolution"
evening - the early part of night (from dinner until bedtime) spent in a special way; "an evening at the opera"
hebdomad, week - any period of seven consecutive days; "it rained for a week"
fortnight, two weeks - a period of fourteen consecutive days; "most major tennis tournaments last a fortnight"
weekend - a time period usually extending from Friday night through Sunday; more loosely defined as any period of successive days including one and only one Sunday
Indian summer, Saint Martin's summer - a period of unusually warm weather in the autumn
year - the period of time that it takes for a planet (as, e.g., Earth or Mars) to make a complete revolution around the sun; "a Martian year takes 687 of our days"
schooltime, school day, school - the period of instruction in a school; the time period when school is in session; "stay after school"; "he didn't miss a single day of school"; "when the school day was done we would walk home together"
2.period - the interval taken to complete one cycle of a regularly repeating phenomenon
interval, time interval - a definite length of time marked off by two instants
orbit period - the time it takes to complete one full orbit around a celestial body; "the orbit period depends on the altitude of the satellite"
3.period - (ice hockey) one of three divisions into which play is divided in hockey games
hockey game, ice hockey, hockey - a game played on an ice rink by two opposing teams of six skaters each who try to knock a flat round puck into the opponents' goal with angled sticks
division, section, part - one of the portions into which something is regarded as divided and which together constitute a whole; "the written part of the exam"; "the finance section of the company"; "the BBC's engineering division"
period of play, playing period, play - (in games or plays or other performances) the time during which play proceeds; "rain stopped play in the 4th inning"
4.period - a unit of geological time during which a system of rocks formed; "ganoid fishes swarmed during the earlier geological periods"
geologic time, geological time - the time of the physical formation and development of the earth (especially prior to human history)
geological era, era - a major division of geological time; an era is usually divided into two or more periods
epoch - a unit of geological time that is a subdivision of a period and is itself divided into ages
glacial epoch, glacial period, ice age - any period of time during which glaciers covered a large part of the earth's surface; "the most recent ice age was during the Pleistocene"
5.period - the end or completion of something; "death put a period to his endeavors"; "a change soon put a period to my tranquility"
figure of speech, trope, image, figure - language used in a figurative or nonliteral sense
end, ending - the point in time at which something ends; "the end of the year"; "the ending of warranty period"
6.period - the monthly discharge of blood from the uterus of nonpregnant women from puberty to menopauseperiod - the monthly discharge of blood from the uterus of nonpregnant women from puberty to menopause; "the women were sickly and subject to excessive menstruation"; "a woman does not take the gout unless her menses be stopped"--Hippocrates; "the semen begins to appear in males and to be emitted at the same time of life that the catamenia begin to flow in females"--Aristotle
expelling, discharge, emission - any of several bodily processes by which substances go out of the body; "the discharge of pus"
hypermenorrhea, menorrhagia - abnormally heavy or prolonged menstruation; can be a symptom of uterine tumors and can lead to anemia if prolonged
oligomenorrhea - abnormally light or infrequent menstruation
7.period - a punctuation mark (.) placed at the end of a declarative sentence to indicate a full stop or after abbreviations; "in England they call a period a stop"
punctuation mark, punctuation - the marks used to clarify meaning by indicating separation of words into sentences and clauses and phrases
suspension point - (usually plural) one of a series of points indicating that something has been omitted or that the sentence is incomplete

period

noun
1. time, term, season, space, run, stretch, spell, phase, patch (Brit. informal), interval, span a period of a few months
2. age, generation, years, time, days, term, stage, date, cycle, era, epoch, aeon the Victorian period
3. class, session, lesson a Biology period

period

noun
1. A specific length of time characterized by the occurrence of certain conditions or events:
2. A particular time notable for its distinctive characteristics:
age, day, epoch, era, time (often used in plural).
3. An interval regarded as a distinct evolutionary or developmental unit:
4. A span designated for a given activity:
Translations
عَهْد، عَصْرفَتْرَهمُدَّةًمن نَفْس الفَتْرَهنُقْطَة
tečkaobdobíperiodaa tečkadoba
periodepunktumtidsaldertidsrumtidstypisk
pisteajanjaksojaksokausi
periodtočkarazdobljedoba
időszakkorabeliperióduspontstíl-
frá tilteknu tímabilipunkturtímabiltími, skeiî, tímabil
期間終止符
기간마침표
būdingas tam tikrai epochailaikotarpismetasperiodasperiodinis
laika posmslaikmeta-laikmetsperiodspunkts
bodkadobový
pikadobaobdobje
periodpunkt
มหัพภาค จุดระยะเวลา
dönemnoktasürebelli bir döneme aitçağ
dấu chấm câuthời kỳ

period

[ˈpɪərɪəd]
A. N
1. (= length of time) → período m; (= time limit) → plazo m; (= era) → época f; (= stage) (in career, development etc) → etapa f (Sport) → tiempo m
for a period of three weeksdurante (un período de) tres semanas
within a three month perioden tres meses, dentro de un plazo de tres meses
for a limited periodpor un periodo limitado
at that period (of my life)en aquella época (de mi vida)
the holiday periodel período de vacaciones
the postwar periodla posguerra
the Victorian periodla época victoriana
a painting from his early periodun cuadro de su primera época
2. (Scol) → clase f, hora f
we have two French periodstenemos dos clases or horas de francés
3. (Gram) → período m; (= full stop) (esp US) → punto m
I said no, periodhe dicho que no, y punto
4. (= menstruation) → período m, regla f
I've got my periodestoy con la regla
B. CPD period cost Ncosto m fijo
period dress Ntraje(s) mpl de época
period furniture Nmuebles mpl de época
period instrument Ninstrumento m de época
period pain Ndolores fpl menstruales
period piece N (= film) → película f de época; (= novel) → novela f de época

period

[ˈpɪəriəd]
npériode f
for a limited period → pour une période limitée
a period of economic stability → une période de stabilité économique
for a period of three weeks → pour (une période de) trois semaines
a period of a few months → une période de quelques mois
in a 24-hour period → en l'espace de 24 heures
the holiday period (British)la période des vacances
époque f
the Victorian period → l'époque victorienne
cours m
Each period lasts forty minutes → Chaque cours dure quarante minutes.
(= full stop) → point m
I won't do it. Period → Je ne le ferai pas, point.
[woman] → règles fpl
painful periods → règles douloureuses
to have one's period → avoir ses règles
I'm having my period → J'ai mes règles.
adj [instrument, furniture] → d'époque; [features] → d'époque period dramaperiod costume period dress ncostume m d'époqueperiod drama n (= play) → drame m historique

period

n
(= length of time)Zeit f; (= age, epoch)Zeitalter nt, → Epoche f; (Geol) → Periode f; Picasso’s blue periodPicassos blaue Periode; for a period of eight weeks/two hoursfür eine (Zeit)dauer or einen Zeitraum von acht Wochen/zwei Stunden; within a three-month periodinnerhalb von drei Monaten; for a three-month perioddrei Monate lang; at that period (of my life)zu diesem Zeitpunkt (in meinem Leben); a period of cold weathereine Kaltwetterperiode; the costume etc of the perioddie Kleidung etc der damaligen Zeit; a writer of the periodein zeitgenössischer Schriftsteller
(Sch) → (Schul)stunde f; double periodDoppelstunde f
(form: of sentence) → Periode f; (esp US: = full stop) → Punkt m; I don’t know anything about American literature period (esp US) → ich habe überhaupt keine Ahnung von amerikanischer Literatur; I’m not going period! (esp US) → ich gehe nicht, Schluss or und damit basta (inf)!
(= menstruation)Periode f, → Monatsblutung f, → Tage pl (inf); she missed a periodsie bekam ihre Periode etc nicht
(Chem) → Periode f

period

:
period costume, period dress
period furniture
nantike Möbel pl

period

:
period pains
period piece
n
antikes Stück; (= painting, music etc)Zeitdokument nt
(also period play)Zeitstück nt

period

[ˈpɪərɪəd]
1. n
a. (length of time) → periodo; (stage, in career, development) → periodo, momento (Am) (Ftbl) → tempo
for a period of three weeks → per un periodo di or per la durata di tre settimane
at that period (of my life) → in quel periodo (della mia vita)
the holiday period (Brit) → il periodo delle vacanze
the Victorian period → l'epoca or l'età vittoriana
a painting of his early period → un dipinto del suo primo periodo
b. (Scol) → ora
c. (Am) (full stop) → punto
d. (menstruation) → mestruazioni fpl
2. adj (costume) → d'epoca

period

(ˈpiəriəd) noun
1. any length of time. a period of three days; a period of waiting.
2. a stage in the Earth's development, an artist's development, in history etc. the Pleistocene period; the modern period.
3. the punctuation mark (.), put at the end of a sentence; a full stop.
adjective
(of furniture, costumes etc) of or from the same or appropriate time in history; antique or very old. period costumes; His house is full of period furniture (=antique furniture).
ˌperiˈodic (-ˈo-) adjective
1. happening, done etc occasionally. He suffers from periodic fits of depression.
2. (also ˌperiˈodical) happening, done etc at regular intervals. periodical reports.
ˌperiˈodically adverb
We see each other periodically.
ˌperiˈodical (-ˈo-) noun
a magazine which is issued regularly (every week, month etc).
adjective
see periodic.

period

مُدَّةً, نُقْطَة období, tečka periode, punktum Periode, Punkt περίοδος, τελεία periodo, punto ajanjakso, piste période, point period, točka periodo, punto 期間, 終止符 기간, 마침표 periode, punt punktum, tidsrom kropka, okres período, ponto final период, точка period, punkt มหัพภาค จุด, ระยะเวลา dönem, nokta dấu chấm câu, thời kỳ 句点, 时期

per·i·od

n. período;
intervalo de tiempo; época;
incubation ______ de incubación;
latency ______ de latencia;
1. período, menstruación, menses, regla;
2. gr. punto.

period

n período or periodo; (menstrual) período or periodo, menstruación f, regla; Do you still have periods?..¿Sigue menstruando?..¿Todavía menstrua? …Are you on your period?..¿Está menstruando hoy?…When was your last period?..¿Cuándo fue su último período (última menstruación)?; incubation — período de incubación
References in classic literature ?
This cap was a beacon to the inquiring eyes of her family, who during these periods kept their distance, merely popping in their heads semi-occasionally to ask, with interest, "Does genius burn, Jo?
In reality he was much in earnest and sometimes suffered prolonged periods of re- morse because he could not go crying the word of God in the highways and byways of the town.
For word had been given out that there would be no more long periods of travel.
There are periods of despondency and suffering which take possession of me.
Perhaps no district throughout the wide extent of the intermediate frontiers can furnish a livelier picture of the cruelty and fierceness of the savage warfare of those periods than the country which lies between the head waters of the Hudson and the adjacent lakes.
Efforts, it is true, were made by the Pyncheons, not only then, but at various periods for nearly a hundred years afterwards, to obtain what they stubbornly persisted in deeming their right.
The founders of the greater part of the families which now compose the aristocracy of Salem might here be traced, from the petty and obscure beginnings of their traffic, at periods generally much posterior to the Revolution, upward to what their children look upon as long-established rank,
Besides, if you regard him very closely, and time him with your watch, you will find that when unmolested, there is an undeviating rhyme between the periods of his jets and the ordinary periods of respiration.
To do Dinah justice, she had, at irregular periods, paroxyms of reformation and arrangement, which she called "clarin' up times," when she would begin with great zeal, and turn every drawer and closet wrong side outward, on to the floor or tables, and make the ordinary confusion seven-fold more confounded.
I said "petrified" was good; as I be- lieved, myself, that the only right way to classify the majestic ages of some of those jokes was by geologic periods.
Such a companion for herself in the periods of anxiety and cheerlessness before her
Having, at certain periods of my life been in the habit of cultivating friendly terms with strange locks, I found no difficulty in establishing myself on a familiar footing with Miss Vanstone's boxes.