periphrasis


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

pe·riph·ra·sis

 (pə-rĭf′rə-sĭs)
n. pl. pe·riph·ra·ses (-sēz′)
1. The use of circumlocution.
2. A circumlocution.

[Latin, from Greek, from periphrazein, to express periphrastically : peri-, peri- + phrazein, to say; see gwhren- in Indo-European roots.]

periphrasis

(pəˈrɪfrəsɪs)
n, pl -rases (-rəˌsiːz)
1. a roundabout way of expressing something; circumlocution
2. an expression of this kind
[C16: via Latin from Greek, from peri- + phrazein to declare]

pe•riph•ra•sis

(pəˈrɪf rə sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-ˌsiz)
1. the use of a verbose or roundabout form of expression; circumlocution.
2. an expression phrased in this way.
3.
a. the use of two or more words instead of an inflected word to express the same grammatical function.
b. an example of this.
[1525–35; < Latin < Greek períphrasis. See peri-, phrase]

periphrasis

1. a roundabout way of speaking or writing; circumlocution.
2. an expression in such fashion. Cf. paraphrasis. — periphrastic, adj.
See also: Language
1. a roundabout way of speaking or writing; circumlocution.
2. an expression in such fashion. See also language. — periphrastic, adj.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices

periphrasis

1. An indirect way of expressing something.
2. A roundabout way of expressing a point.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.periphrasis - a style that involves indirect ways of expressing thingsperiphrasis - a style that involves indirect ways of expressing things
verboseness, verbosity - an expressive style that uses excessive or empty words
Translations

periphrasis

[pəˈrɪfrəsɪs] N (periphrases (pl)) [pəˈrɪfrəsiːz]perífrasis f inv
References in periodicals archive ?
Modern Mandaic has preserved the perfect but, like Turoyo/[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and NENA, eliminated the imperfect in favor of the MidAr periphrasis based on the present active participle in status absolutus (Macuch 1993: 68ff.
07 and still be happy submits that what we need is irony, a kind maybe of periphrasis, e.
Despite differences among the theories in Greek rhetoric, we can speak of a relatively common ground among them, so that even different figures of speech such as metalepsis, synecdoche, periphrasis, and so forth were defined through the same concepts.
He explains the houses, exaltations, termini and faces of the zodiacal signs, using mythological periphrasis as well as astrological terminology taken from technical manuals--such as putei and azemena.
Burke claims that British apprehensions about the thing that he insists on denominating by the brutal term "Regicide Peace" are quieted only "by totally putting it out of sight, by substituting for it, through a sort of periphrasis, something of an ambiguous quality, and describing such a connection [a peace between Britain and France] under the terms of `the usual relations of peace and amity.
The second part of the volume and several poems in various cycles are devoted to this topic, accompanied by definitions of such tropes as simile, periphrasis, and hyperbole.
37) Maybe he should be allowed a little modesty on this occasion; certainly the final Latin quatrain is very unlikely to be of his own composition, if only because it uses a Latin periphrasis for 'to print', comprimere formis, which is only used at this time by Italian writers.
They come closest to resembling a grammatical periphrasis such as .
The following abbreviations are used in the glosses: ABL ablative, ABS absolutive, ACC accusative, AOR aorist, ASSERT assertion, A:DCL affirmative declarative, COMP complementizer, COP copula, DAT dative, EMPH emphatic, ERG ergative, F future, FREQ frequentative, INF infinitive, IPF imperfective, IRR irrealis, KINPOSS kin possessive, LOC locative, NEG negative, NOM nominative, OPT optative, PC past completive, PER periphrasis form, PF perfective, PL plural, POSS possessive, PRF perfect, PROP proprietive, PST past, PTP participle, PURP purposive, QUOT quotation, SBST substantivizer, SG singular, SRSS superessive, and SUG suggestive.
The distancing nuance describes the fact that the subject aims in a direction away from himself (rendered in English by the periphrasis "up and move," projected in my translation onto the object of the verb with the t stem).
The fear of cancer is so compelling in fact, that critics themselves do not utter the word, referring to the novel "by allusion and periphrasis, carefully avoiding the unspeakable word, and so continuing the silence" (162).