perpendicular


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Related to perpendicular: perpendicular slope

per·pen·dic·u·lar

 (pûr′pən-dĭk′yə-lər)
adj.
1. Mathematics Intersecting at or forming right angles.
2. Being at right angles to the horizontal; vertical. See Synonyms at vertical.
3. often Perpendicular Of or relating to a style of English Gothic architecture of the 1300s and 1400s, characterized by the use of fan vaulting and broad windows with many mullions.
adv.
In a perpendicular position.
n.
1. Mathematics A line or plane perpendicular to a given line or plane.
2. A perpendicular position.
3. A device, such as a plumb line, that is used in marking the vertical from a given point.
4. A vertical or nearly vertical line or plane.

[Middle English perpendiculer, from Old French, from Latin perpendiculāris, from perpendiculum, plumb line, from perpendere, to weigh carefully : per-, per- + pendere, to weigh; see (s)pen- in Indo-European roots.]

per′pen·dic′u·lar′i·ty (-lăr′ĭ-tē) n.
per′pen·dic′u·lar·ly adv.

perpendicular

(ˌpɜːpənˈdɪkjʊlə)
adj
1. (Mathematics) Also: normal at right angles to a horizontal plane
2. (Architecture) denoting, relating to, or having the style of Gothic architecture used in England during the 14th and 15th centuries, characterized by tracery having vertical lines, a four-centred arch, and fan vaulting
3. upright; vertical
n
4. (Mathematics) geometry a line or plane perpendicular to another
5. (Tools) any instrument used for indicating the vertical line through a given point
6. (Mountaineering) mountaineering a nearly vertical face
[C14: from Latin perpendiculāris, from perpendiculum a plumb line, from per- through + pendēre to hang]
perpendicularity n
ˌperpenˈdicularly adv

per•pen•dic•u•lar

(ˌpɜr pənˈdɪk yə lər)

adj.
1. vertical; straight up and down; upright.
2. meeting a given line or surface at right angles.
3. maintaining a standing or upright position; standing up.
4. having a sharp pitch or slope; steep.
5. (cap.) of or pertaining to the last phase of English Gothic architecture, prevailing from the late 14th to early 16th century, characterized by predominantly vertical tracery and the use of the fan vault.
n.
6. a perpendicular line, plane, or position.
7. an instrument for indicating the vertical line from any point.
[1350–1400; Middle English perpendiculer(e) < (Anglo-French, Old French) < Latin perpendiculāris vertical =perpendicul(um) plumb line (see perpend2, -i-, -cule2) + -āris -ar1]
per`pen•dic`u•lar′i•ty, n.
per`pen•dic′u•lar•ly, adv.

per·pen·dic·u·lar

(pûr′pən-dĭk′yə-lər)
Adjective
Intersecting at or forming a right angle or right angles.
Noun
A line or plane that is perpendicular to a given line or plane.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.perpendicular - a straight line at right angles to another lineperpendicular - a straight line at right angles to another line
straight line - a line traced by a point traveling in a constant direction; a line of zero curvature; "the shortest distance between two points is a straight line"
2.perpendicular - a Gothic style in 14th and 15th century Englandperpendicular - a Gothic style in 14th and 15th century England; characterized by vertical lines and a four-centered (Tudor) arch and fan vaulting
Gothic architecture, Gothic - a style of architecture developed in northern France that spread throughout Europe between the 12th and 16th centuries; characterized by slender vertical piers and counterbalancing buttresses and by vaulting and pointed arches
Tudor architecture - a style of English-Gothic architecture popular during the Tudor period; characterized by half-timbered houses
3.perpendicular - a cord from which a metal weight is suspended pointing directly to the earth's center of gravityperpendicular - a cord from which a metal weight is suspended pointing directly to the earth's center of gravity; used to determine the vertical from a given point
cord - a line made of twisted fibers or threads; "the bundle was tied with a cord"
lead line, sounding line - (nautical) plumb line for determining depth
plumb, plumb bob, plummet - the metal bob of a plumb line
plumb rule - a plumb line attached to a narrow board
4.perpendicular - an extremely steep face
face - a vertical surface of a building or cliff
Adj.1.perpendicular - intersecting at or forming right angles; "the axes are perpendicular to each other"
oblique - slanting or inclined in direction or course or position--neither parallel nor perpendicular nor right-angled; "the oblique rays of the winter sun"; "acute and obtuse angles are oblique angles"; "the axis of an oblique cone is not perpendicular to its base"
parallel - being everywhere equidistant and not intersecting; "parallel lines never converge"; "concentric circles are parallel"; "dancers in two parallel rows"
2.perpendicular - at right angles to the plane of the horizon or a base lineperpendicular - at right angles to the plane of the horizon or a base line; "a vertical camera angle"; "the monument consists of two vertical pillars supporting a horizontal slab"; "measure the perpendicular height"
steep - having a sharp inclination; "the steep attic stairs"; "steep cliffs"
straight - having no deviations; "straight lines"; "straight roads across the desert"; "straight teeth"; "straight shoulders"
3.perpendicular - extremely steep; "the great perpendicular face of the cliff"
steep - having a sharp inclination; "the steep attic stairs"; "steep cliffs"

perpendicular

adjective
1. upright, straight, vertical, plumb, on end the perpendicular wall of sandstone
2. steep, sheer, precipitous, vertiginous a narrow, exposed beach and perpendicular cliffs
3. at right angles, at 90 degrees The left wing dipped until it was perpendicular to the ground.

perpendicular

adjective
At right angles to the horizon or to level ground:
Translations
عَمودي، مُتَعامِد
kolmýsráznýsvislý
lodret
merőleges
lóîréttur
statmenaistatmenas
perpendikulārs, vertikāls, statenisks
prostopadły
normalvinkelrät

perpendicular

[ˌpɜːpənˈdɪkjʊləʳ]
A. ADJ
1. (Math) → perpendicular
2. (Archit) perteneciente al estilo gótico de los siglos XIV y XV en Gran Bretaña
B. Nperpendicular f
to be out of (the) perpendicularsalir de la perpendicular, no estar a plomo

perpendicular

[ˌpɜːrpənˈdɪkjʊlər]
adj [line, surface] → perpendiculaire
to be perpendicular to sth → être perpendiculaire à qch
n
the perpendicular → la perpendiculaire
to restore sth to the perpendicular → remettre qch à la verticale
The pillar had been restored to the perpendicular → Le pilier avait été remis à la verticale.

perpendicular

adj
senkrecht (to zu); the wall is not quite perpendicular to the ceilingdie Mauer steht nicht ganz lotrecht zur Decke; a perpendicular cliffeine senkrecht abfallende Klippe
(Archit) → perpendikular
nSenkrechte f; to drop a perpendicularein Lot fällen; to be out of perpendicularnicht im Lot sein

perpendicular

[ˌpɜːpnˈdɪkjʊləʳ]
1. adj (gen) (Math) → perpendicolare; (cliff) → a picco
2. nperpendicolare f

perpendicular

(pəːpənˈdikjulə) adjective
standing, rising etc straight upwards; vertical. a perpendicular cliff.
ˌperpenˈdicularly adverb

perpendicular

a. perpendicular.
References in classic literature ?
The scout, while making his remarks, was busied in collecting certain necessary implements; as he concluded, he moved silently by the group of travelers, accompanied by the Mohicans, who seemed to comprehend his intentions with instinctive readiness, when the whole three disappeared in succession, seeming to vanish against the dark face of a perpendicular rock that rose to the height of a few yards, within as many feet of the water's edge.
But what most puzzled and confounded you was a long, limber, portentous, black mass of something hovering in the centre of the picture over three blue, dim, perpendicular lines floating in a nameless yeast.
With a grating rush, the three lines flew round the loggerheads with such a force as to gouge deep grooves in them; while so fearful were the harpooneers that this rapid sounding would soon exhaust the lines, that using all their dexterous might, they caught repeated smoking turns with the rope to hold on; till at last --owing to the perpendicular strain from the lead-lined chocks of the boats, whence the three ropes went straight down into the blue --the gunwales of the bows were almost even with the water, while the three sterns tilted high in the air.
A few moments' scrambling brought them to the top of the ledge; the path then passed between a narrow defile, where only one could walk at a time, till suddenly they came to a rift or chasm more than a yard in breadth, and beyond which lay a pile of rocks, separate from the rest of the ledge, standing full thirty feet high, with its sides steep and perpendicular as those of a castle.
They are common defects of my own, and one mustn't criticise other people on grounds where he can't stand perpendicular himself.
You can't back a raft upstream, you can't hurry it downstream, you can't scatter out to one side when you haven't any room to speak of, you won't take to the perpendicular cliffs on the other shore when they appear to be blasting there, too.
she and I must have some talk;" and bending from the perpendicular, he installed his person in the arm- chair opposite Mrs.
Lorry sat at great books ruled for figures, with perpendicular iron bars to his window as if that were ruled for figures too, and everything under the clouds were a sum.
I made out that I was fastened to a stout perpendicular ladder a few inches from the wall - a fixture there - the means of ascent to the loft above.
Crackenthorp herself, the summit of whose perpendicular feather was on a level with the Squire's shoulder--luring fair lasses complacently conscious of very short waists and skirts blameless of front-folds--luring burly fathers in large variegated waistcoats, and ruddy sons, for the most part shy and sheepish, in short nether garments and very long coat-tails.
These four perpendicular ranges of windows admitted air, and, the fire being kindled, heat, or smoke at least, to each of the galleries.
Away to the northward, out to sea, ran a line of bars and shoals and rocks that would never let a ship come within six miles of the beach, and between the islands and the mainland was a stretch of deep water that ran up to the perpendicular cliffs, and somewhere below the cliffs was the mouth of the tunnel.