personableness


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.
Related to personableness: accommodating, inscrutable person

per·son·a·ble

 (pûr′sə-nə-bəl)
adj.
1. Pleasantly sociable.
2. Pleasing in appearance; attractive.

per′son·a·ble·ness n.
per′son·a·bly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.personableness - the complex of attributes that make a person socially attractive
personality - the complex of all the attributes--behavioral, temperamental, emotional and mental--that characterize a unique individual; "their different reactions reflected their very different personalities"; "it is his nature to help others"
sociability, sociableness - the relative tendency or disposition to be sociable or associate with one's fellows
References in classic literature ?
In fact, as I have long been convinced, though every profession is necessary and honourable in its turn, it is only the lot of those who are not obliged to follow any, who can live in a regular way, in the country, choosing their own hours, following their own pursuits, and living on their own property, without the torment of trying for more; it is only their lot, I say, to hold the blessings of health and a good appearance to the utmost: I know no other set of men but what lose something of their personableness when they cease to be quite young.
She uses it in conversation to describe various more or less intelligible performances by old brilliant people, whether artists, scientists, or intellectuals, where the bare outlines of a creative idiom seems finally to emerge from what had been the obscuring puppy fat of personableness, timeliness, or sometimes even of coherent sense.
His personableness, patience, and humor in public were not indicative of his work, which was always serious, even if the results were light-hearted or deeply beautiful.
Michael's really keen to hear real people's stories too, and he's admitted how much he loves meeting people, and that personableness and charm really comes across to everyone watching.
Characteristics of caring, warmth, and supportiveness appeared to contribute to patients' satisfaction with nursing staff members' capability and personableness.
I suspect it had to do with the personableness of the informant, an ease in dealing with the work of the anthropologist/ linguist, an appreciation of the anthropological enterprise as well as an ability on the part of the informant to grasp the needs of the anthropologist/linguist.