perspectivist


Also found in: Wikipedia.

perspectivist

(pəˈspɛktɪvɪst)
n
(Art Terms) a person who uses perspective in art to create particular results
References in periodicals archive ?
And a wealthy urbanite in his fifties, whose family sold its landholdings at independence and who has begun to read critical colonial histories penned at liberal Western universities, framed today's tensions through an overtly perspectivist lens:
1) Pfitz - and likewise each other character in the novel - is a series of chance appearances that are connected in the minds of other characters, and the reader, in a perspectivist and continually changing manner.
Dalloway, for example, Sass's point is that Woolf was involved in writing perspectivist art (30).
What remains outside of this scheme is the possibility of using general categories as instruments for a perspectivist endeavor that identifies "alternative historical forms".
For several centuries, from the Renaissance to Romanticism, the Western art world pledged allegiance to perspectivist systems, whereby three-dimensional space was rationalized and conveyed through two-dimensional representations.
The World's Fairs displayed themselves and their host cities as perspectivist and totalizing domains the function of which was to deploy and survey the world's spectacular multiplicities and differences.
Both the recent constructivist and realist approaches of democracy aimed at overcoming rigid conceptualizations and strong theoretical views on democracy and resorted to contextual analysis, comparative studies, perspectivist considerations and issue-oriented investigations in order to endorse the plural character of democratic societies and institutions and the essentially dynamic nature of democratic processes.
To put this distinction in context, it will be necessary to look for a moment at what many commentators have identified as the perspectivist outlook of the Zhuangi.
Moreover, user-centric approaches may lead to a perspectivist description of objects and their performativity, a description that concentrates on interpretation processes and apprehends objects as "singular, intangible, untouched" (Mol, 1999, page 76).
Folk pedagogy (Olson & Bruner, 1996) is much closer to the view that school is the place where false ideas are got rid of, which is cognitively simpler and emotionally safer, as it does not force the subject to face up to the uncertainty involved in a perspectivist stance.
ThT illustrates Lonergan's insight into and perspectivist method of reaching moral truth and its justification.
On the contrary, they pointedly blend representational imagery and abstraction and reject a homogeneous conception of space in favor of a multifaceted, perspectivist view.