perspicuous


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per·spic·u·ous

 (pər-spĭk′yo͞o-əs)
adj.
1. Clearly expressed or presented; easy to understand: perspicuous prose.
2. Expressing oneself clearly and effectively: a perspicuous lecturer.
3. Discerning; perspicacious.

[From Latin perspicuus, from perspicere, to see through; see perspicacious.]

per·spic′u·ous·ly adv.
per·spic′u·ous·ness n.

perspicuous

(pəˈspɪkjʊəs)
adj
(of speech or writing) easily understood; lucid
[C15: from Latin perspicuus transparent, from perspicere to explore thoroughly; see perspective]
perˈspicuously adv
perˈspicuousness n

per•spic•u•ous

(pərˈspɪk yu əs)

adj.
clearly expressed or presented; lucid.
[1470–80; < Latin perspicuus transparent =perspic-, s. of perspicere to look or see through (per- per- + -spicere, comb. form of specere to look; see inspect) + -uus deverbal adj. suffix; see -ous]
per•spic′u•ous•ly, adv.
per•spic′u•ous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.perspicuous - (of language) transparently clear; easily understandable; "writes in a limpid style"; "lucid directions"; "a luculent oration"- Robert Burton; "pellucid prose"; "a crystal clear explanation"; "a perspicuous argument"
language, linguistic communication - a systematic means of communicating by the use of sounds or conventional symbols; "he taught foreign languages"; "the language introduced is standard throughout the text"; "the speed with which a program can be executed depends on the language in which it is written"
clear - readily apparent to the mind; "a clear and present danger"; "a clear explanation"; "a clear case of murder"; "a clear indication that she was angry"; "gave us a clear idea of human nature"
Translations

perspicuous

[ˌpəˈspɪkjʊəs] ADJ (frm) → perspicuo

perspicuous

adjeinleuchtend; (= clear) expression, statementklar, verständlich
References in classic literature ?
But the limit as fixed by the nature of the drama itself is this: the greater the length, the more beautiful will the piece be by reason of its size, provided that the whole be perspicuous.
For a mind so perspicuous as that of D'Artagnan, this indulgence was a light by which he caught a glimpse of a better future.
A perspicuous style negates the need for a "search for meaning" in presenting information in the clearest and simplest manner.
He declares that drama "is the imitation of life, the glass of custom, and the image of truth," intimating that a mimetic representation is capable of rendering virtue more perspicuous and attainable to its auditors--a familiar enough claim for the moral value of dramatic art.
In Andrews's account, Southey's History of Brazil (1810, 1817, 1819) reflects Southey's aim of writing history that was perspicuous, "rememberable," and circumstantial (CLRS 1671), "judging] of men according to their age, country, situation, and even time of life" (Vindiciae Ecclesice Anglicance [1826]; qtd.
These visibly bisected marks register a double temporality of drawing and "undrawing" that reprises but also renders more perspicuous the constitutive role of the reserves in his first experiments with the striped format.
The "bold and perspicuous windows" of Ventana's award-winning novels throw back the outdated curtains of conformity to look critically at the institutions and ideologies of our postmodern times, as he examines the potential for future development.
Strategic core competencies entail the combination of physical and human resources, which facilitate the organization's couched and perspicuous knowledge (Espino-Rodriguez & Pardon-Robanina, 2005).
Thus one purpose of the present paper is to offer a more perspicuous restatement of this argument, one which shows clearly why the responses in question do not work.
united in [The Big Typescript] by means of the old idea of a perspicuous representation of "grammar" modified by the notion of "calculus"' (116)?
The conceit of the Enlightenment, one could say, was charming us to the indefinite extent to which consciousness might be enlarged, the degree to which knowledge could become perspicuous.
If Wesley's use of "exalt" is not perspicuous, even less apparent is the relevance of this prayer to the believers' daily toil.