persuasiveness


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per·sua·sive

 (pər-swā′sĭv, -zĭv)
adj.
Tending or having the power to persuade: a persuasive argument.

per·sua′sive·ly adv.
per·sua′sive·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.persuasiveness - the power to induce the taking of a course of action or the embracing of a point of view by means of argument or entreaty; "the strength of his argument settled the matter"
power, powerfulness - possession of controlling influence; "the deterrent power of nuclear weapons"; "the power of his love saved her"; "his powerfulness was concealed by a gentle facade"
convincingness - the power of argument or evidence to cause belief
unpersuasiveness - inability to persuade
Translations
إقْناع
přesvědčivost
overtalelsesevne
rábeszélőképesség
sannfæringarkraftur
ikna yeteneğiinandırıcılık

persuasiveness

[pəˈsweɪsɪvnɪs] Npersuasiva f

persuasiveness

[pərˈsweɪsɪvnɪs] n [person, argument] → pouvoir m de persuasion

persuasiveness

n (of person, salesman etc)Überredungskunst f, → Beredsamkeit f; (of argument etc)Überzeugungskraft f

persuasiveness

[pəˈsweɪsɪvnɪs] n (of person, argument) → potere or forza di convinzione

persuade

(pəˈsweid) verb
1. to make (someone) (not) do something, by arguing with him or advising him. We persuaded him (not) to go.
2. to make (someone) certain (that something is the case); to convince. We eventually persuaded him that we were serious.
perˈsuasion (-ʒən) noun
the act of persuading. He gave in to our persuasion and did what we wanted him to do.
perˈsuasive (-siv) adjective
able to persuade. He is a persuasive speaker; His arguments are persuasive.
perˈsuasively adverb
perˈsuasiveness noun
References in classic literature ?
Nevertheless, ere long, the warm, warbling persuasiveness of the pleasant, holiday weather we came to, seemed gradually to charm him from his mood.
He spoke as if those bullets could not kill him, and his half-closed eyes gave still more persuasiveness to his words.
His smile is rare and sweet; his manner, perfectly quiet and retiring, has yet a latent persuasiveness in it which is (to women) irresistibly winning.
Philip, with his passion for the romantic, welcomed the opportunity to get in touch with a Spaniard; he used all his persuasiveness to overcome the man's reluctance.
Being superior to physical suffering, it sometimes chanced that they were superior to any consolation which the missionaries could offer; and the law to do as you would be done by fell with less persuasiveness on the ears of those who, for their part, did not care how they were done by, who loved their enemies after a new fashion, and came very near freely forgiving them all they did.
But he could talk fluently enough, as became apparent when changing his tone to persuasiveness he went on: "By listening to you as I did, I think I have proved that I do not regard our intercourse as strictly official.
And thanks to Kerry's persistence and persuasiveness, he's spent the night at the salon and had some food and a haircut.
During the exhibition, the finalists shared their concepts and projects with the public while the judges weaved through the cubicles to rate them on their quality of work, idea and innovation, on the strength of their project management as well as on the clarity and persuasiveness of the business outlet.
During the two-day event, Mashroo3i judges will rate the individual teams based on the quality of the business idea in terms of innovation and uniqueness, as well as on the strength of project management, and the clarity and persuasiveness of the business outlet.
In fact, the researchers found that people tend to overestimate the power of their persuasiveness via text-based communication, and underestimate the power of their persuasiveness via face-to-face communication.
Working with students from three Michigan high schools, we sought to learn how students evaluated the relative trustworthiness and persuasiveness of various forms of legitimate evidence and how (if at all) they drew on various sources of evidence in public policy deliberations.
Chrysippus explained it in terms of the persuasiveness of impressions ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]).