pertinency


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per·ti·nent

 (pûr′tn-ənt)
adj.
Clearly related to a matter at hand. See Synonyms at relevant.

[Middle English, from Old French partenant, pertinent, from Latin pertinēns, pertinent-, present participle of pertinēre, to pertain; see pertain.]

per′ti·nence, per′ti·nen·cy n.
per′ti·nent·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pertinency - relevance by virtue of being applicable to the matter at hand
relevance, relevancy - the relation of something to the matter at hand
germaneness - pertinence by virtue of a close relation to the matter at hand

pertinency

noun
References in periodicals archive ?
Dubois called it the first Afrikaans novel that was both "helemaal Afrikaans, [en] van intellectuele inzet en niveau helemaal 'europees'" ("completely Afrikaans, and completely European in terms of intellectual effort and level"); Greshoff praised Leroux's ability to free himself from the taboos and prejudices that had hindered the psychological novel hitherto; for Rob Antonissen, the "orakel van Grahamstad" ("oracle of Grahamstown"), Colet, demonstrating unprecedented pertinency in the handling of sexual contents as well as "iets meesterliks" ("something masterly") in the stream-of-consciousness ending, was the only novel of 1955 that gave reason for "'n sekere hoop" ("a certain hope") in the future of the form in Afrikaans (Kannemeyer, Leroux 167-70).
The meeting discussed problematic issues of pricing pertinency provided by international and Ukrainian exchanges and its application in transfer pricing, as well as the ways of the formation of a modern stock market in Ukraine.
Presence emerged as a key theme of discussion in both controversies because it was assumed that what is valued is that which will be given presence: "By the very fact of selecting certain elements and presenting them to the audience, their importance and pertinency to the discussion are implied" (Perelman and Olbrechts-Tyteca 1969, 116).
On the continuing pertinency of this monetary explanation for early modern inflation, and its relation to other sorts of explanation, see Mayhew passim.
Further, class bias is inscribed within the very institutional ensemble of the state as a social relation of production which not only permits a radical critique of liberal ideology but also promotes interest in the class pertinency and practices of the state as a strategic site of struggle (Poulantzas 1973: 63-4).