peseta


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pe·se·ta

 (pə-sā′tə)
n.
The primary unit of currency in Spain and Andorra before the adoption of the euro.

[Spanish, diminutive of peso, peso; see peso.]

peseta

(pəˈseɪtə; Spanish peˈseta)
n
(Currencies) the former standard monetary unit of Spain and Andorra, divided into 100 céntimos; replaced by the euro in 2002
[C19: from Spanish, diminutive of peso]

pe•se•ta

(pəˈseɪ tə)

n., pl. -tas (-təz).
the basic currency of Spain, which has a fixed value relative to the euro.
[1805–15; < Sp, diminutive of pesa a weight]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.peseta - formerly the basic unit of money in Spainpeseta - formerly the basic unit of money in Spain; equal to 100 centimos
centimo - a fractional monetary unit of Venezuela and Costa Rica and Equatorial Guinea and Paraguay and Spain
Spanish monetary unit - monetary unit in Spain
Translations
العِمْلَة السّابِقَه في إسبانيا
peseta
peseta
pezeta
peseti
peseta
peseta
peseta
peseta

peseta

[pəˈsetə] Npeseta f

peseta

[pəˈseɪtə] npeseta f

peseta

nPeseta f

peseta

(pəˈseitə) noun
the standard unit of currency in Spain before the Euro.
References in classic literature ?
Don't reward him with more than one peseta, Senor, whatever he does.
WE are going to Spain soon and I have just found that our 3,000 pesetas in notes and coins left from last year can no longer be used.
And wine with your meal was never cheaper than when paid for in pesetas.
SUNNY ACCEPTANCE: Tourist Spain with its multinational enclaves has greeted the transition from peseta to euro with equanimity
All those old francs, pesetas and drachmas which people have lying around in drawers at home will be little use to anyone travelling abroad once they cease to be legal tender at the end of February, but they can be of real value to charities like Age Concern.
ATHE peseta has been part of the euro monetary system since January 1, 1999, so don't worry.
This means that unless British holidaymakers reconvert their hoarded Spanish pesetas, Italian lira and French francs back into sterling they will become worthless pieces of coloured paper.
Demand in the Spanish institutional tranche amounted to 687 billion pesetas, or 8.
Having strengthened by 22 pesetas to 287 to the pound in recent months, the sterling effect is measurable but not a determining factor.
Nevertheless, the mark, which had moved down in the ERM since early in the year, declined further to trade near its bilateral parity limit with the Italian lira and Spanish peseta.
I AM going on holiday to Tenerife in March, and I have 8,000 pesetas left from my last holiday there.
Anyone changing pounds for the weaker European currencies such as the peseta and the escudo will get about 11 per cent more than last year if they trade in advance.