petal


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pet·al

 (pĕt′l)
n.
One of the often brightly colored parts of a flower immediately surrounding the reproductive organs; a division of the corolla.

[New Latin petalum, from Greek petalon, leaf; see petə- in Indo-European roots.]

pet′aled, pet′alled adj.

petal

(ˈpɛtəl)
n
(Botany) any of the separate parts of the corolla of a flower: often brightly coloured
[C18: from New Latin petalum, from Greek petalon leaf; related to petannunai to lie open]
ˈpetaline adj
ˈpetal-ˌlike adj
ˈpetalled adj

pet•al

(ˈpɛt l)

n.
one of the often colored segments of the corolla of a flower.
[1695–1705; < New Latin petalum; Latin: metal plate < Greek pétalon thin plate, leaf, n. use of neuter of pétalos spread out, akin to petannýnai to be open]
pet′aled, pet′alled, adj.

pet·al

(pĕt′l)
One of the often brightly colored parts of a flower surrounding the reproductive organs. Petals may be separate or joined at their bases. As a group, the petals are called the corolla. See more at flower.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.petal - part of the perianth that is usually brightly coloredpetal - part of the perianth that is usually brightly colored
floral leaf - a modified leaf that is part of a flower
corolla - (botany) the whorl of petals of a flower that collectively form an inner floral envelope or layer of the perianth; "we cultivate the flower for its corolla"
Translations
بَتْلَه، تُوَيْجِيَّه
korunní plátek
kronblad
szirom
krónublaî
žiedlapis
ziedlapa
okvetný lístok
cvetni list
taç yaprak

petal

[ˈpetl] Npétalo m

petal

[ˈpɛtəl] npétale mPE teacher nprofesseur mf de sport

petal

nBlütenblatt nt; settle petal! (Brit inf: = calm down) → beruhige dich, jetzt komm mal runter (inf)

petal

[ˈpɛtl] npetalo

petal

(ˈpetl) noun
one of the usually brightly coloured leaf-like parts of a flower. This rose has yellow petals edged with pink.
References in classic literature ?
And on the top-most spray of the Rose-tree there blossomed a marvellous rose, petal following petal, as song followed song.
Then she brought him water in a petal, which he drank, after which he related to her how he had torn one of his wings on a bramble, so that he could not fly as fast as the other swallows, who had flown far away to warmer lands.
Selfish, indeed, were he who would envy you one petal of that wonderful rose--Rosa Mundi--God has given you to gather.
No more charming face, clear-cut like an antique gem, and delicate in colouring like the petal of a flower, had ever been set on, alas
He learned that suffering and freedom have their limits and that those limits are very near together; that the person in a bed of roses with one crumpled petal suffered as keenly as he now, sleeping on the bare damp earth with one side growing chilled while the other was warming; and that when he had put on tight dancing shoes he had suffered just as he did now when he walked with bare feet that were covered with sores- his footgear having long since fallen to pieces.
The end was to come while the rainbow still sparkled on her wine of life, ere a single petal had fallen from her rose of joy.
As I was painting the bright petals of a blue bell, it told me this tale.
If only her petals curled up a little more, she'd be all right.
Undoing the silver clasps, he opened the volume, and took from among its black-letter pages a rose, or what was once a rose, though now the green leaves and crimson petals had assumed one brownish hue, and the ancient flower seemed ready to crumble to dust in the doctor's hands.
Homologous parts, as has been remarked by some authors, tend to cohere; this is often seen in monstrous plants; and nothing is more common than the union of homologous parts in normal structures, as the union of the petals of the corolla into a tube.
The white petals re-entered their red cases, the flowers faded as I looked, and the bush changed into a block of stony knobs.
The heat was terribly oppressive, and the huge sunlight flamed like a monstrous dahlia with petals of yellow fire.