petard


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pe·tard

 (pĭ-tärd′)
n.
1. A small bell-shaped bomb used to breach a gate or wall.
2. A loud firecracker.
Idiom:
be hoist with one's own petard
To be undone by one's own schemes.

[French pétard, from Old French, from peter, to break wind, from pet, a breaking of wind, from Latin pēditum, from neuter past participle of pēdere, to break wind; see pezd- in Indo-European roots.]
Word History: The idiom to be hoist by one's own petard originates in Shakespeare's Hamlet (written around 1600). In the play, Claudius, the Danish king and Hamlet's stepfather, entreats two of Hamlet's schoolfellows, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, to betray Hamlet—the pair are to escort Hamlet to England, carrying a letter instructing the English king to put Hamlet to death. Learning of the plot to kill him, Hamlet contemplates how to turn the tables against them: "For 'tis the sport to have the enginer / Hoist with his own petar; and't shall go hard / But I will delve one yard below their mines / And blow them at the moon." Hoist is the past participle of hoise, an earlier form of the verb hoist, "to be lifted up," while a petar or petard is a small bomb used in early modern warfare. The phrase "hoist with his own petard" therefore means "to be blown up with his own bomb." Contemporary audiences must have been struck by Shakespeare's turn of phrase, because it soon became a commonplace expression in 17th-century English.

petard

(pɪˈtɑːd)
n
1. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) (formerly) a device containing explosives used to breach a wall, doors, etc
2. hoist with one's own petard being the victim of one's own schemes
3. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) a type of explosive firework
[C16: from French: firework, from péter to break wind, from Latin pēdere]

pe•tard

(pɪˈtɑrd)

n.
1. an explosive device formerly used in warfare to blow in a door or gate, form a breach in a wall, etc.
2. a firecracker making a loud noise.
Idioms:
hoist by or with one's own petard, caught by the very device one had contrived to hurt another.
[1598; < Middle French, =pet(er) to break wind (derivative of pet < Latin pēditum a breaking wind, orig. neuter past participle of pēdere to break wind) + -ard -ard]

petard

An artwork produced to draw attention to itself through unusual composition, subject matter, etc.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.petard - an explosive device used to break down a gate or wallpetard - an explosive device used to break down a gate or wall
explosive device - device that bursts with sudden violence from internal energy
Translations

petard

[peˈtɑːd] Npetardo m
he was hoist with his own petardle salió el tiro por la culata

petard

nPetarde f ? hoist

petard

[pɪˈtɑːd] to be hoist with one's own petardessere preso/a nelle proprie reti
References in classic literature ?
I was appalled; yet to think of Therese being hoisted with her own petard was like a turn of affairs in a farce.
the din of all the great double petards of the Saint-Jean, the discharge of twenty arquebuses on supports, the detonation of that famous serpentine of the Tower of Billy, which, during the siege of Paris, on Sunday, the twenty-sixth of September, 1465, killed seven Burgundians at one blow, the explosion of all the powder stored at the gate of the Temple, would have rent his ears less rudely at that solemn and dramatic moment, than these few words, which fell from the lips of the usher, "His eminence, Monseigneur the Cardinal de Bourbon.
are better served by their pens than their petards.
Born on May 7, 1920, in Two Gates, Fazeley, near Tamworth, Grazier served on HMS Petard, a destroyer.
The appointment comes days after Citigroup, Inc hired UBS veteran Jean-Baptiste Petard to a newly created global industrials role based in London.
Born on May 7, 1920, in Two Gates, Fazeley, near Tamworth, Grazier served on HMS Petard, a P Class destroyer which had the rare distinction of sinking a sub from each of the three Axis navies - the German U-Boat U-559, Italy's Uarsciek and the Japanese I-27.
Hoist with his own petard, Yasay reverted to saying he 'did not legally acquire American citizenship, as the basis of the grant of citizenship was 'flawed and defective.
The Tories, who tried to pin all the blame on immigration for their own failure to build enough homes, or to properly fund our NHS, are hoist by their own petard with only four more AMs than Ukip; but this is small consolation for Welsh Lib Dems, who have paid a high price for Nick Clegg trading all their hopes of much-needed parliamentary and voting reform for the vainglorious title of deputy PM.
But thanks to Esther, Haman's scheme totally and completely backfires and he ends up being hoisted with his own petard.
The PM and his Chancellor are hoist by their own petard, now we've discovered shamed former boss Paul Flowers entertained Tories on a night out at the party's own conference.
It simply does not make sense for a venture such as this to be hoist by its own petard.
Condemned forever to the back benches, hoist by his own petard, the hapless Fox hunted down by the pack.