petitionary


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to petitionary: entreaty

pe·ti·tion

 (pə-tĭsh′ən)
n.
1. A solemn supplication or request, especially to a superior authority; an entreaty.
2. A formal written document requesting a right or benefit from a person or group in authority.
3. Law
a. A formal written application seeking a court's intervention and action on a matter: a petition for review of a previous court's decision.
b. A pleading initiating a legal case in some civil courts: a bankruptcy petition.
4. Something requested or entreated: granted our petition.
v. pe·ti·tioned, pe·ti·tion·ing, pe·ti·tions
v.tr.
1. To address a petition to: petitioned the king for a pardon.
2. To ask for by petition; request formally: petitioned that the sentence be reduced.
v.intr.
To make a request, especially formally: petitioned for retrial.

[Middle English peticion, from Old French petition, from Latin petītiō, petītiōn-, from petītus, past participle of petere, to request; see pet- in Indo-European roots.]

pe·ti′tion·ar′y (pə-tĭsh′ə-nĕr′ē) adj.
pe·ti′tion·er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.petitionary - of the nature of or expressing a petition; "the petitionary procedure had a quality of indecisiveness"
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
James (1902/1958) observed differences in those who prayed, pointing out that some focus on petitionary prayers rather than more meditative experiences of communing with God.
Byrd and Boe (2001) found that the dimension of anxious adult attachment positively correlated with petitionary prayer, suggesting that those who experience emotional dysregulation in their adult attachment relationships engage in help-seeking prayer.
The recorded petitionary prayers bring the audience into the play and Groves then dramatizes them being answered.
Such sacred portraits are chiefly aids to petitionary prayer, the usefulness of which is often depicted sardonically by Roy.
At points, he conceives of them not practicing petitionary prayer, only offering thanksgiving, and perhaps even that only through the meditatorial king (Letters 204-205).
In Latin, this petitionary form is expressed by the use of the subjunctive mood: "per istam sanctam unctionem et suam piissimam misericordiam, indulgeat tibi etc.
In addition, brief forays are made into topics such as religious rituals, petitionary prayer, spirit possession, and ecstatic mystical encounters.
In an introduction to a volume I edited called Liturgy Time and the Politics of Redemption, I spoke of the particular character of petitionary prayer exemplified most dramatically by Hannah--a woman whose prayer was deemed exemplary by the rabbis.
The Dakotas' petitionary prayer reflected their status in a power-filled universe that could both help and harm.
There is an equally interesting discussion of petitionary and intercessory prayer (217-32) in the splendid chapter on prayer, whose central question is 'what is its point?
IN ANCIENT ISRAEL, God characteristically answers petitionary prayers with powerful intervention.
Prayer to Mother Earth and Father God in ritual context illustrates the communicative and petitionary features of both religions: two vocabularies, two metaphors.