petulance


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Related to petulance: petulantly

pet·u·lant

 (pĕch′ə-lənt)
adj.
1. Unreasonably irritable or ill-tempered; peevish.
2. Contemptuous in speech or behavior.

[Latin petulāns, petulant-, insolent, from petere, to assail; see pet- in Indo-European roots.]

pet′u·lance, pet′u·lan·cy n.
pet′u·lant·ly adv.

petulance

1. the condition or quality of being irritable, peevish, or impatient.
2. an irritable or peevish statement or action. Also petulancy. — petulant, adj.
See also: Attitudes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.petulance - an irritable petulant feelingpetulance - an irritable petulant feeling  
ill humor, ill humour, distemper - an angry and disagreeable mood
testiness, tetchiness, touchiness - feeling easily irritated
pet - a fit of petulance or sulkiness (especially at what is felt to be a slight)

petulance

Translations

petulance

[ˈpetjʊləns] Nmal humor m, irritabilidad f

petulance

, petulancy
nverdrießliche Art; (of child)bockige Art (inf)

petulance

[ˈpɛtjʊləns] nirritabilità
References in classic literature ?
But although no man with less scruple made his ordinary habits and feelings bend to his interest, it was the misfortune of this Prince, that his levity and petulance were perpetually breaking out, and undoing all that had been gained by his previous dissimulation.
I felt a gust of hysterical petulance, and went aft and stared dismally at nothing.
Her continual disagreements with her mother, her rash squabbles with Tom and Charles, and petulance with Betsey, were at least so distressing to Fanny that, though admitting they were by no means without provocation, she feared the disposition that could push them to such length must be far from amiable, and from affording any repose to herself.
The influence which the bigotry of one female,[6] the petulance of another,[7] and the cabals of a third,[8] had in the contemporary policy, ferments, and pacifications, of a considerable part of Europe, are topics that have been too often descanted upon not to be generally known.
I told myself that I could never stop, and with a gust of petulance I resolved to stop forthwith.
It was gratitude; gratitude, not merely for having once loved her, but for loving her still well enough to forgive all the petulance and acrimony of her manner in rejecting him, and all the unjust accusations accompanying her rejection.
Oh I dare say, Miss La Creevy,' returned Mrs Nickleby, with a petulance not unnatural in her unhappy circumstances, 'it's very easy to say cheer up, but if you had as many occasions to cheer up as I have had--and there,' said Mrs Nickleby, stopping short.
The rickety house shook to a heavy, prideless tread, and through the inner door came Sarah, middle-aged, lop-breasted, hair-tousled, her face lined with care and fat petulance.
Always mature for her age, she had gained a certain aplomb in both carriage and conversation, which made her seem more of a woman of the world than she was, but her old petulance now and then showed itself, her strong will still held its own, and her native frankness was unspoiled by foreign polish.
Clare; but he threw back her suggestions with a restless petulance, unlike his usual careless good-humor.
Surely her words and looks are not to be interpreted against her, when she is not sufficiently mistress of herself to exert her natural jud gment -- when she shows the unreason able petulance of a child on a question which is not of the slightest importance.
The king, jealous, as a young man and as a monarch, of the superiority of those who surrounded him, could not resist admitting himself vanquished by a petulance so thoroughly French in its nature, whose energy was more than ever increased by English humor.