peyotism


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

peyotism

(ˈpeɪəʊˌtɪzəm)
n
(Other Non-Christian Religions) a religion of native American Indians that incorporates the ritual use of peyote
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Inspired by their experience, they wrote a series of essays explaining and defending the consumption of peyote and the practice of peyotism.
So where peyotism characterized Progressives in the Southwest, it seemed howlingly retrograde to those in the North and Midwest.
These health-seeking behaviors vary widely from culture to culture, and these essays reflect that diversity in their studies of health-seeking behaviors among Mexican-Americans, African-Americans, Africans located in Namibia, Nigerian-Americans, Arab-Americans, native Hawaiians, resettled refugees of Southeast Asian ethnicities, people in the health care system of India, practitioners of Big and Little Moon peyotism, Asians in Singapore, and the aforesaid affluent who seek healing and health on the Internet.
When their traditional world began to crumble in the wake of the Euro-American incursion, the Osage determined to retain their traditional faith and added Peyotism to it.
Finally, the association between religion and illusion is developed both in the passages relating to the Salem witchhunts and in those describing the rise of peyotism among the Indian population.
Contemporary Navajo peyotism also incorporates aspects of orthodox traditional religion and philosophy.
The Incorporation of the Indian Body: Peyotism and the Pan-Indian Public, 1911-1923.
As Peyotism emerged, it developed a moral and ethical system to guide its members along the so-called Peyote Road.
Scott Richard Lyons, "The Incorporation of the Indian Body: Peyotism and the Pan-Indian Public, 1911-1923," in Rhetoric, the Polis, and the Global Village: Selected Papers from the 1998 Thirtieth Anniversary Rhetoric Society of America Conference (Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1999), 152.
These debates and discourses at the juncture of state formation structured the chartering of the Native American Church (NAC) in Oklahoma ten years later in 1918, creating the legal foundation for the practice of Peyotism throughout the United States and Canada, where it is now the largest intertribal Indigenous religion in North America.
They did not share a religion, as a host of Christian churches--Episcopal, Catholic, Mission Alliance, to name only a few--had been around for over a generation and functioned alongside (and usually in opposition to) traditional ceremonial institutions like the Midewiwin and pan-Indian practices such as peyotism and the sweat lodge.