phalanx


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pha·lanx

 (fā′lăngks′, făl′ăngks′)
n. pl. pha·lanx·es or pha·lan·ges (fə-lăn′jēz, fā-)
1. A compact or close-knit body of people: "formed a solid phalanx in defense of the Constitution and Protestant religion" (G.M. Trevelyan).
2. A formation of infantry carrying overlapping shields and long spears, developed by Philip II of Macedon and used by Alexander the Great.
3. pl. phalanges Anatomy A bone of a finger or toe. Also called phalange.

[Latin phalanx, phalang-, from Greek.]

phalanx

(ˈfælæŋks)
n, pl phalanxes or phalanges (fæˈlændʒiːz)
1. (Military) an ancient Greek and Macedonian battle formation of hoplites presenting long spears from behind a wall of overlapping shields
2. any closely ranked unit or mass of people: the police formed a phalanx to protect the embassy.
3. a number of people united for a common purpose
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in Fourierism) a group of approximately 1800 persons forming a commune in which all property is collectively owned
5. (Anatomy) anatomy any of the bones of the fingers or toes.
6. (Botany) botany
a. a bundle of stamens, joined together by their stalks (filaments)
b. a form of vegetative spread in which the advance is on a broad front, as in the common reed. Compare guerrilla
[C16: via Latin from Greek: infantry formation in close ranks, bone of finger or toe]

pha•lanx

(ˈfeɪ læŋks, ˈfæl æŋks)

n., pl. pha•lanx•es for 1-6, pha•lan•ges (fəˈlæn dʒiz for 7.)
1. (in ancient Greece) a group of heavily armed infantry formed in ranks and files close and deep, with shields joined and long spears overlapping.
2. any body of troops in close array.
3. a number of persons united for a common purpose.
4. a compact or closely massed body of persons, animals, or things.
5. (in Fourierism) a group of about 1800 persons, living together and holding their property in common.
6. any of the bones of the fingers or toes.
[1545–55; < Latin < Greek phálanx military formation, bone of finger or toe, wooden roller]

phalanx

an ancient military formation of serried ranks surrounded by shields; hence, any crowded mass of people or group united for a common purpose.
See also: Crowds

Phalanx

 a line or array of battle; a compact group of people or animals prepared for attack or defence; a body of persons or things drawn up together in a common purpose.
Examples: phalanx of cavaliers and dames, 1837; of elms, 1891; of Greeks, 1983; of infantry; of lawyers, 1817; of sheep, 1785; of soldiers, 1553; of migrating storks, 1733.

phalanx

A Greek military formation of ranked armored hoplites.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phalanx - any of the bones of the fingers or toesphalanx - any of the bones of the fingers or toes
bone, os - rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
dactyl, digit - a finger or toe in human beings or corresponding body part in other vertebrates
2.phalanx - any closely ranked crowd of people
crowd - a large number of things or people considered together; "a crowd of insects assembled around the flowers"
3.phalanx - a body of troops in close array
military force, military group, military unit, force - a unit that is part of some military service; "he sent Caesar a force of six thousand men"
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"

phalanx

noun
Related words
adjective phalangeal
Translations
falangi
falanga

phalanx

[ˈfælæŋks] N (phalanges (pl)) [fæˈlændʒiːz]falange f

phalanx

n pl <-es or phalanges>
(Anat) → Finger-/Zehenglied nt, → Phalanx f (spec)
(= body of people, troops)Phalanx f

pha·lanx

n. falange, uno de los huesos largos de los dedos de los pies o las manos.
References in classic literature ?
Keep your fingers from that bitter phalanx of vials.
In eight days more the night of performance would arrive; a phalanx of social martyrs two hundred strong had been convened to witness it; three full rehearsals were absolutely necessary; and two characters in the play were not filled yet.
All in a moment through the gloom were seen Ten thousand Banners rise into the Air With Orient Colours waving: with them rose A Forrest huge of Spears: and thronging Helms Appear'd, and serried Shields in thick array Of depth immeasurable: Anon they move In perfect PHALANX to the Dorian mood Of Flutes and soft Recorders; such as rais'd To highth of noblest temper Hero's old Arming to Battel, and in stead of rage Deliberate valour breath'd, firm and unmov'd With dread of death to flight or foul retreat, Nor wanting power to mitigate and swage With solemn touches, troubl'd thoughts, and chase Anguish and doubt and fear and sorrow and pain From mortal or immortal minds.
If your holy scruples can dispense with using the Jew's tablets, for the pen I can find a remedy,'' said the yeoman; and, bending his bow, he aimed his shaft at a wild-goose which was soaring over their heads, the advanced-guard of a phalanx of his tribe, which were winging their way to the distant and solitary fens of Holderness.
Meantime bands of Convicts occupied every entrance with an impenetrable phalanx.
Around the door, from which the drummer still sent forth his thundering summons, was drawn up a formidable phalanx, including several of the oldest members of the congregation, many of the middle aged, and nearly all the younger males.
In a dense phalanx, blocking the streets from side to side, the crowd set forth, taking the route of Regent Street, Pall Mall, St.
I see clearly before me the solid phalanx of men from Missouri, some urging me to tell it to the King of Denmark, others insisting that I produce my Eskimos.
What I saw was a solid phalanx of armed men between myself and a dais supporting a great bench of carved sorapus wood.
At Athens too the disposition of the citizens is not the same, for those who live in the Piraeus are more attached to a popular government than those who live in the city properly so called; for as the interposition of a rivulet, however small, will occasion the line of the phalanx to fluctuate, so any trifling disagreement will be the cause of seditions; but they will not so soon flow from anything else as from the disagreement between virtue and vice, and next to that between poverty and riches, and so on in order, one cause having more influence than another; one of which that I last mentioned.
Friendship and association are very fine things, and a grand phalanx of the best of the human race, banded for some catholic object; yes, excellent; but remember that no society can ever be so large as one man.
But, up to that moment, he had remained with the numerous phalanx of the incredulous.