phantasy

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phantasy

(ˈfæntəsɪ)
n, pl -sies
an archaic spelling of fantasy

fan•ta•sy

or phan•ta•sy

(ˈfæn tə si, -zi)

n., pl. -sies, n.
1. imagination, esp. when extravagant and unrestrained.
2. the forming of mental images, esp. wondrous or strange fancies; imaginative conceptualizing.
3. the succession of mental images thus formed.
4. an imagined or conjured up sequence of events, esp. one provoked by an unfulfilled psychological need.
5. an abnormal or bizarre sequence of mental images, as a hallucination.
6. a supposition based on no solid foundation; illusion.
7. caprice; whim.
8. an imaginative or fanciful creation; intricate, elaborate, or whimiscal design.
9. a form of fiction based on imaginative or fanciful characters and premises.
v.i.
11. to form mental images; imagine; fantasize.
12. to write or play fantasias.
v.t.
13. to form mental images of; create in the mind.
[1275–1325; Middle English: imaginative faculty < Latin phantasia < Greek phantasía idea, notion]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phantasy - something many people believe that is falsephantasy - something many people believe that is false; "they have the illusion that I am very wealthy"
misconception - an incorrect conception
bubble - an impracticable and illusory idea; "he didn't want to burst the newcomer's bubble"
ignis fatuus, will-o'-the-wisp - an illusion that misleads
wishful thinking - the illusion that what you wish for is actually true
2.phantasy - fiction with a large amount of imagination in it; "she made a lot of money writing romantic fantasies"
fiction - a literary work based on the imagination and not necessarily on fact
science fiction - literary fantasy involving the imagined impact of science on society
3.phantasy - imagination unrestricted by realityphantasy - imagination unrestricted by reality; "a schoolgirl fantasy"
imagination, imaginativeness, vision - the formation of a mental image of something that is not perceived as real and is not present to the senses; "popular imagination created a world of demons"; "imagination reveals what the world could be"
pipe dream, dream - a fantastic but vain hope (from fantasies induced by the opium pipe); "I have this pipe dream about being emperor of the universe"
fantasy life, phantasy life - an imaginary life lived in a fantasy world
fairyland, fantasy world, phantasy world - something existing solely in the imagination (but often mistaken for reality)

phantasy

see fantasy
Translations

phantasy

[ˈfæntəzɪ] Nfantasía f
References in classic literature ?
Deep within her there was something that would not be cheated by phantasies and that demanded some definite answer from life.
In the finale she fell into some of those grotesque attitudes which were at the time popular among the dancers in the theatres up-town, giving to the Bowery public the phantasies of the aristocratic theatre-going public, at reduced rates.
To the there-named south-fruits now, Similar, all-too-similar, Do I lie here; by little Flying insects Round-sniffled and round-played, And also by yet littler, Foolisher, and peccabler Wishes and phantasies,-- Environed by you, Ye silent, presentientest Maiden-kittens, Dudu and Suleika, --ROUNDSPHINXED, that into one word I may crowd much feeling:
In "Hysterical Phantasies and their Relation to Bisexuality," Freud asserts that a symptom is a substitution, based on similarity (sameness): "Hysterical symptoms are nothing other than unconscious phantasies brought into view through 'conversion' .
This in turn revives the phantasies and guilt feelings related to the Oedipus complex.
It is only the highly introverted nature of classical archaeology as it is still commonly practised -- isolated as much from the realities of the ancient world as it is from other forms of archaeology -- that allows such phantasies to be repeated.
but for common cause in the strategic analysis of the psychic and social anchoring points that keep us locked into the oppressive and unhappy phantasies of love and hate that condition our mutual enmeshment.
The free circulation of these ideas as phantasies is necessary in order to avoid an analytical psychotic countertransference and the production of a "folie-a-deux" of the kind that Bollas reports (184-85), which traumatically marks the life of the patient and of his family.
The Footlights concert waltz, the Three Men, London Again and Summer Days suites and the sparky Television March are all attractive enough, but the main material comes in the two Phantasies The Selfish Giant and Cinderella.
Predation and incorporation, or the bonds of body-destruction phantasies, are fundamental components of human social relationships and as such culturally ordered.
She may also be using these episodes to explore the life of her imagination, and the relationships among her childhood fantasies, her adult life, and her task of creating an autobiography, for she concludes a subsequent incident, one which also foregrounds her vivid childhood imagination as she persuades her peers that a neighbor has a secret life as an alligator, with the statement that "my phantasies were still fighting against the facts," a statement which the reader might be sorely tempted to revise into the present tense (60).